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    I wonder whether the people advocating that we should standardise on C-x, C-c, C-v for cut/copy/paste reguarly use terminal applications. C-c (that’s ^C for vi users) is already in common use as “interrupt the current rubbing thing”, which means I need to hold down Shift to get the “standard” behaviour in those types of application.

    On a Mac this is not a problem because the mac uses a different modifier for cut/copy/paste and leaves the “ascii-safe” control key available for tty apps. Given that PC keyboards typically also have spare modifier keys (Alt and Windows) in the general neighborhood of Control, I wonder why we can’t standardise on one of those instead. As someone in the LWN comment thread said, CUA doesn’t mandate using Control anyway …

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      Looks like exactly what I need. I like the mobility of my 13-inch MacBook, but after starting a few docker containers it sounds like a rocket.

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        On the same topic - handmade hero live reloading of c++ game engine:

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          Vista after SP1 was okay, but on introduction it had quite a few issues.

          Another issue is that a lot of manufacturers underspec’d their laptops for Vista and that they were dog slow. Windows 7 usually ran smoother on the same laptops. I also liked the Windows 7 UI more; it took the Vista UI and polished it, similar to how Windows 10 polished Windows 8 (I guess? I never used Windows 10 much).

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            I think Swift may be a more suitable choice than Rust if you aren’t doing systems programming. You get most of the speed, a very similar type system and nice immutable value types, and don’t have to deal with the borrow checker. But they’re similar enough that it wouldn’t surprise (but would disappoint) me if Swift didn’t find its niche outside the Apple ecosystem.

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              The Vim defaults aren’t that great either though, and that seems to be doing fairly well in spite of it. I’m not so sure this is really the reason; especially not stuff like “dark background” which seems like quite literal bikeshed painting.

              I’m not so sure it’s fair to dismiss backwards compatibility as “grumpy greybeards”; it’s just annoying when behaviour changes, and preserving backwards compatibility in any user-facing application seems like a good goal. Vim tries to find a middle ground with its defaults.vim, but that’s just messy and makes things even more confusing.

              Something like a defaults 2 in your startup file might be a good idea; Vim already has this with set [no]compatible and various programming languages have something similar as well (e.g. use strict in Perl and JavaScript). Perhaps the default could even be the new defaults and people wanting to retain the old defaults can use defaults 1.

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                Yes. Vscode is running the file handling stuff all on that remote box. sshfs latency is unbearable for larger projects.

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                  Not intentionally crippling Emacs would probably go a long way too (that entire thread is worth a read, this message pretty much sums up the attitude).

                  I don’t know what happened what that specific issue since 2015, but the entire attitude certainly was a huge turn-off for me.

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                    Over the last 40 years since Emacs was initially created the world of computing changed a lot. “Modern” users expect certain conventions that Emacs (or Vim, for that matter) lack. That doesn’t mean those conventions are better or worse, just … different. Even though Emacs hasn’t changed, in a way the learning curve has increased over time.

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                      Off topic, but this is the first merged story I see, cool!.

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                        Just got access to Codespaces, you need to select a GitHub repository in order to start/create a Codespace. You can open a Terminal in Codespaces and use ssh/git commands, so you could connect to other git repositories as well but I don’t think the underlying storage is persistent and everything’s pulled from the stored GitHub repo.

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                          Miniflux looks really good, except for the Postgres DB requirement. SQLite would have sufficed feature-wise and would have made deploying it a breeze.

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                            Yeah, it seems to me better defaults doesn’t mean making Emacs imitate a different editor, but make the existing experience more pleasant. It’s the kind of thing that makes the greybeards happy without changing their workflow, and allow people interested in Emacs as Emacs to not get disappointed with a backwards experience without having to slather a readymade config on top.

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                              I’d just run SPECcpu if you have it.

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                                Chromium is much more expensive to run than Python, Java, or QT by a huge margin.

                                I don’t know; have you ever tried running Eclipse or one of the IntelliJ IDEs? VSCode seems a lot faster to me, in my “let’s check this out test runs” anyway (I don’t really use it). Also, I use the Spotify desktop client which is built on Electron too I believe, and that works alright for me.

                                As for security, I’m not so sure it’s that much larger than, say, a PyQt app with a bunch of dependencies, or a Java app with a bunch of dependencies. I know people love to complain about it, but Web APIs aren’t actually that large compared to any complete desktop/GUI system (actually, I think it may be smaller). In the context of an IDE, I don’t see how it’s a security problem at all since you’re running a local desktop app which already implies full trust. Any scriptable environment + extensions is just as secure or insecure as VSCode; it’s not like Vim or Emacs sandboxes its extensions or anything.

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                                  ??? I mean it could be that some packages are just better than the default behavior?

                                  There’s arguments for the copy paste stuff but like you’re gonna tell me Helm is Actually Worse Than Nothing?

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                                    Far be it from me to question the value of good defaults, but I don’t think they’re the answer here.

                                    Emacs has never been an editor that promised a good experience out of the box; if anything, that’s completely orthogonal to its actual purpose. (That niche already being filled by the likes of vim, vscode, sublime text, etc.) If somebody doesn’t want to create their own editing experience, then there is no reason for them to even consider using emacs in the first place.

                                    If anything, the poor defaults nudge you to learn how to fix them and, in the process, learn more about the editor. I probably would never have learnt about early-init.el if not for emacs’s coming with a light theme, hideous splash screen, scrollbar, etc.

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                                      I am greatly looking forward to RBS, but am sure will be some time before I am using 3.0 at $WORK. I will likely start a few backlogged toy projects, from a grab-bag that I would normally ignore, just for the excuse to experience RBS.

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                                        This is a profoundly disappointing article and exchange.

                                        One of the commenters nailed it “with friends like these, who needs enemies”.

                                        My only response to RMS’s singuarly unfortunate quote

                                        It is unfortunate that the people who implemented the newer editors chose incompatibility with Emacs.

                                        is what an absolutely myopic view to take. What a chowderhead.

                                        I switched from Vim to Emacs maybe 7 years ago for the Clojure tooling. It was a massive pain in the ass. I had to relearn all my muscle memory. I had to learn elisp. I had to cobble together an emacs config that added enough “extras” (color themes! workable package manager settings! minimap! etc etc etc) and by the time I was done with that it took about two minutes to boot my emacs config because ???

                                        Many years of hand-managing and cursing my .emacs later, I picked up DOOM, turned off the evil-mode defaults because my muscle memory is thoroughly rebuilt at this point and have had an absolutely delightful experience. Reasonable defaults, useful packages in the box, responsive upstream, everything you could ask for!

                                        I will leave this with a much older rebuttal (2004) along these same lines. Upstream is being shortsighted and the personalities have a lot to do with it.

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                                          If I remember correctly this is how xmonad handles configuration changes.