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    What does VP stand for in this context?

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      Go’s approach to interfaces are pretty uncommon and worth understanding.

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        I really like the tilde verse!

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          Windows NT and commodity clouds weren’t vaporware. Even Midori got built and deployed in the field. It turned vaporware in general market cuz Microsoft wanted nothing threatening their cash cow.

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            This is a dangerous meme. The average non-degreed developer earns less than a degreed one, so at some point it does matter. Your person at your company is anecdotal and, unfortunately, not representational.

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              It’s a tough line to tow, for sure. As an industry, we’re terrible at interviewing and sometimes its easy to go with the “safe” option. From the cold, purely capitalistic standpoint of a company, I think it makes sense to go with safety.

              This, of course, ignores the socio-political reasons of why certain people go to nicer schools than others, equal access, etc.

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                That’s true, you could be right.

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                  Weren’t Flash developers buying condos in London back then?

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                    China has MANY minority ethnic groups. Not sure why you think China has one group of people.

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                      This is really neat. The decentralized social network idea has been attempted for many years (one implementation was Diaspora in 2010), but a simple git backed version seems to be the way to go.

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                        Because, according to @icefox

                        The authors are also very cagey about their data sources, saying just that they are “ID photos”, though they do say that none of them explicitly come from police mugshots.

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                          Vaporware is always much better faster and more provably correct.

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                            Any chance this is based on FOAF?

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                              “Criminal activity” is a social construct, not a biological one.

                              Homosexuality used to be criminal in many jurisdictions. It still is in some. So a system that can implement a “gaydar” by scanning the faces of people and determining their sexual orientation would classify some gay people as criminals in one jurisdiction, and not criminals in others.

                              The legalization of marijuana has gained popularity in many states and countries lately. A hypothetical program that could pick out potheads from their physical characteristics would classify them as criminals then, and presumably as criminals now - even though they are no longer criminals in the eyes of law.

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                                Oh dear. “Should you use open source crypto [libraries].” (hopefully unnecessary: YES)

                                Open Source Hardware users is the target audience, so I get that this isn’t like crypto research presentations, but this topic list feels far behind the current conversations occurring in these spaces..

                                1.  

                                  There’s an interesting cautionary tale that’s relevant: Bruce Schneier’s 1994 Applied Cryptography, which so effectively and clearly describe various tools and systems in crypto that many developers began implementing them from scratch. This was addressed in the quasi-follow-up Cryptography Engineering (2010) but left echoes for years in the form of now-defunct PHP sites all over the web with homebrewed implementations of MD5, block ciphers, etc.

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                                    I have a file of jokes of mine and this one is appropriate.

                                    With regards to Linux kernel development practices:

                                    The Linux kernel, due to C, is a monument to convention.

                                    Absolutely none of this nonsense is necessary; it’s anti-knowledge. Imagine what operating systems would be like if people weren’t determined to use garbage from the 1970s to reimplement garbage from the 1970s.

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                                      Your summary is accurate. My summary is tongue in cheek. People like hearing things that make them feel like those who perform better than them are cheating, unsustainable, privileged, etc. so that they don’t have to acknowledge that they are anything less than the best.

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                                        Agreed.

                                        Time for a new tact [better communication]

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                                          Please do post again about it. It sounds like an interesting project. Any plans to “go bigger” with it? Like, make some semblance of an official project, make a website, a github repo, release firmware source code, seek hardware partners, etc. etc. I only ask because there is definitely a niche for a really “open” phone. Other projects have come and gone, or are only in Europe (not North America).