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    Feel free to flag this, but thought I’d offer up something that might help bring people some joy in these rough times.

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      In other words, there’s no DRM on typefaces, and foundries still do business. Please take note, software vendors and ebook publishers.

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        I had to use a 2015 MacBook Pro at a previous job. It was a powerful machine for the time, and any customizations I wanted to do were possible.

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          I remember an earlier edition of this book (UNIX System Administration Handbook) well - along with UNIX Power Tools they provided the early foundation of my UNIX knowledge.

          Wow, I didn’t realise that co-author Evi Nemeth is missing at sea.

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            This works really nicely on my phone - much nicer than other things I’ve tried

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              I’ve use my Macbook Air 2018 (previously 2011) as a browser and a dumb terminal to my Linux workstation at Digital Ocean, via mosh/tmux. Its just an Emacs instance running and everything happens inside that.

              I use a Mac instead of OpenBSD on the desktop for Photos (and iPhone/iCloud sync of them), TablePlus, Messages, Spotify, Netflix, Teams and other minor hiccups. I dream of getting to use OpenBSD full time some day though.

              Mostly Python, Go and terraform development.

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                I have a Thinkpad x230, running Debian stable with MATE/Emacs. For most of what I do it’s all I need, except for Android development, because you practically need to use Android Studio (or I at least don’t know of a better way), and that needs at least 4GB of RAM to start (which is just as much as I have by default). I’ve considered using an old desktop with more RAM, and connect to it using VNC, do fix an old app I want to work on again, but setting that up is taking me forever.

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                  Don’t use apps, or be subject to the profit-seeking whims of the companies you depend on.

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                    We see it as courage, VCs see it as defection.

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                      I just hook up a Bluetooth keyboard and it’s basically the same as any other machine to run vim. With split screen I can also have both my vim/tmux session and my web browser open for docs.

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                        I use an iPad ssh’ed into an EC2 instance.

                        How is it like writing code on a tablet? I haven’t used one in a while, but I don’t remember wanting to use it for serious work, especially if you’re working with the command line (no modifier keys is enough to scare me away).

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                          I have used Macs since 2007. I think the first choice to make is whether you want a laptop or desktop. In the case of a desktop, get a Mac Mini or iMac (the Mac Pro is expensive and the previous hardware generation had problems). If you buy an iMac, make sure you get one with a retina display and with an SSD. Non-retina looks terrible on macOS nowadays and APFS on a spinning splatter is slow. It is a disgrace that they still sell iMacs with spinning platters.

                          If you want a laptop, either: buy a 16” MacBook Pro (expensive), one of the newly released MacBook Airs (but do check whether the CPU is powerful enough for your purposes). If you are eying a non-16” MacBook Pro wait until Apple updates the MacBook Pros. The currently sold Pro still has a keyboard with the butterfly mechanism, which is prone to fail.

                          I currently use a MacBook Pro 2018, 256GB SSD, 16GB RAM. Luckily, the keyboard is still fine. I dislike the Touch Bar (get one without if you use the escape key). Overall, I am very happy with the machine. It’s fast enough, has a great screen, and has 4 USB-C ports. Even though macOS Catalina has its problems, macOS is still a great OS.

                          The macOS is less customizable than Linux. The upside is that (once you get used to it) has sane default, consistent keyboard shortcuts between applications, working suspend & resume (at least I never have problems), hardware acceleration of video in all places, application sandboxing (at least from the App Store, outside it’s opt-in), etc. For package management you probably want to install Homebrew, though I use Nix since I use NixOS on my other machine as well.

                          (I develop both on my MacBook Pro and a NUC8i5BEH with NixOS, and several remote GPU servers.)

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                            I’ve worked in networking a good while and have a draft blog post on just this subject - but it’ll probably stay draft a bit longer. 🙂

                            My four main book recommendations are:

                            1. High Performance Browser Networking (available for free online https://hpbn.co) - great crash course on protocols and browsers. This is probably 90% of what most software developers need to know.
                            2. Interconnections by Radia Perlman - if you want to learn about routing protocols, this is still the best resource. Perlman is extremely accomplished in the field and has an accessible writing style. A few newer protocols will be missing, but this will give you the basis you need to pick those up easily from eg. wikipedia
                            3. Network Routing by Deep Medhi and Karthik Ramasamy - I only recommend this for the chapter on hardware, and possibly the chapter on label switching. It has a great overview of how a physical router is actually put together and works, but I found most of the rest of the book extremely dry and nowhere near as engaging as Perlman.
                            4. The Internet Peering Playbook (much of the content is free at drpeering.net) - if you want to understand the people/business rather than the technical side of how the Internet is put together
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                              I’m using a 2014 Macbook Pro since I’m trying to take a pass on the touchbar models for as long as possible. I’m still doing lots of Android and iOS dev and it works fine. All that being said, the most common choice now for devs is probably the 16” Pro, but the new Air looks pretty promising too. The next gen chips from Intel look like a legit step forward, so that might be a good option if you’re looking for something more portable. Whatever you go with, probably worth getting as much RAM as you can get/afford.

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                                I use an iPad ssh’ed into an EC2 instance.

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                                  It seems to me as if Verona investigates several aspects of one problem area: The three questions you mention seem related, in the sense that a language feature that touches any of those is likely going to touch several. On the other hand systematic testing sounds both interesting and worthwhile, but I don’t see how it’s connected to the others. Is it intended to be? If so, how?

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                                    Amusingly, I think one of the first errors we tried to debug with LogRocket (which is generally an impressive tool) might have been caused by the Grammarly extension… Hopefully that is not an omen :)

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                                      Hey thanks to much for the link to your post! I’m an Elixir fellow myself, so I’ll happily digest what you’ve written.

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                                        The best errors are those caused by a user’s browser extension and that have nothing to do with your app at all

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                                          I share some links I collected on networking