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    My book recommendations come from a few sources:

    • Humble Bundle
    • Citations in academic papers
    • Wikipedia citations on articles that I found interesting
    • lobste.rs threads
    • my buddy Colin

    The last book I read that wasn’t from one of these sources was House of Leaves, which kinda just…reached critical mass of overheard mentions one day.

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      Text requires unobtrusive design to be read easily. That’s why most good blogs these days are simple and privilege the text above all else. But in other parts of your personal website, you can just have fun. Imagine having a choose-your-own-adventure game or a list of cool colors you like or your favorite memes on your website. But the second you put your name on your website, you have to be careful about future employers, etc. Psedonymous web playgrounds made just for the sake of it are the retro-future.

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        Technically speaking, “unit test” is about scope while “property based test” is about method and generativity. Seen this way, most PBTs are unit tests.

        In practice, people usually mean “unit test” to mean manual oracle unit tests, and PBT to mean generative property tests of all scopes (but usually unit).

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          That’s a good point. Find the new weird. The internet is too young for us to go back to old weird already

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            Ohh nothing wrong with jQuery ;) I guess I felt real good coding in javascript without having to include it!

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              Thank you for your feedback!! I’m glad that this article was useful!

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                Property testing is a form of unit testing, isn’t it?

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                  +1 for Semantic Scholar

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                    I have been doing JavaScript since 1999 and I can never keep these three functions straight. I finally figured out bind last year but never understood the other two. You can definitely go a long way without using or needing these two (except in ReactJS, seemingly).

                    This is the first time that it’s clicked for me, so thank you!

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                      Yup his extreme views can be a bit much, but, on the other hand, were it not for him and his extreme / preachy nature, we wouldn’t have the entire Gnu suite that powers Linux and many other important FOSS projects.

                      When rms started this crusade, open source wasn’t a thing, and computing was going 100% proprietary.

                      At that time, the BSDs were mired in the AT&T/Bell labs/SCO “UNIX” wars. Things looked grim.

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                        I use jQuery every day at work. It’s pretty funny considering the code base is only 3 years old or thereabouts. The stack is definitely considered “old” by some. I try to make the best of it. Sometimes I’ll just write plain JS and it feels oddly satisfying.

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                          This is a surprisingly pragmatic stance from Stallman. Reading the title, I’d expect him to advocate for tarring and feathering users who wanted to install no free drivers.

                          Instead, the install fest proprietors use it as a preaching/teaching moment and educate people on why an entirely free stack might be better/more desirable.

                          Could he be mellowing with age? :)

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                            This is my friend’s take:

                            http://rainbowdivider.com

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                              My bad, that’s one of the parts of the whole cycle, step by step and I should have stated that before.

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                                Agreed. Maybe discovery isn’t as easy but even on the current platform there are fun and interesting sites.

                                I also like to wax nostalgia on the internet of old but I do not want to bring it back. Find the new weird, don’t try and recreate the old weird

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                                  In my experience, integration tests have the best ROI as they can be relatively simple to write, and test a large area of the code. They are good at spotting issues deep inside the code that might not be obvious at first, and perhaps even wouldn’t be caught by unit testing.

                                  Unit testing on the other hand is perfect for testing library-like code, say your utility library to manage ut8 strings or date calculations, etc.

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                                    <3

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                                      Was Bootstrap one of the reasons the web became boring? The first framework where every site looked the same?

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                                        As someone currently teaching a beginner how to be effective in JavaScript, there is no chance I would introduce any of these three functions at this stage of their learning.

                                        Furthermore, even as a somewhat experienced developer, I have only ever chosen to use bind of the three, and that’s only in the case where I have arbitrarily chosen to not do something along the lines of var that = this.

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                                          I had similar problem with lavarel approach of security see https://github.com/laravel/ideas/issues/698 where they basically refuse to replace == by === despite the proven bugs (security or cnot) they create, they firmly don’t want to correct their bad practice