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  1.  

    I generally agree with your description.

    My use of ‘shallow’ was in the context of logical computation. For example, it can do a bit of very simple arithmetic, but breaks the second it gets a little complicated. But I think it’s also shallow in a more colloquial way. For example, if you ask it to write a song, you will get something plausible, but not much more sophisticated than a common pop song.

    1.  

      Bike parts are reasonably standard regardless of make & model especially on steel frames from US, English, and Japanese manufacturers. Velo Orange is one company that’s really marketed themselves as a maker of parts for old bikes, but they are the nice maker in a market that also includes free parts bins at a community bike kitchen.

        1.  

          The two must useful and time saving features I use with FairMail were in K-9 when I left, and were not planned either. I don’t know if they are there now.

          I absolutely love the ability to Trash or Archive a message from the notification pull down. Also, Trash or Archive in the message list with a single swipe.

          These two features have greatly improved my experience with email, and increased the speed with which I act on my email.

          1.  

            Work, continuing to train new people and maybe theoretically doing some actual programming work.

            Nonwork, continuing to try to break my proof-of-concept typechecker for Garnet. I haven’t definitively succeeded yet, which has me very very tentatively optimistic.

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              I just finished looking the StarWars series Andor (highly recommended even to those who don’t know or like StarWars). On episode 5 there’s a nice discussion about Free Software and Free Hardware, briefly foreshadowed on episode 3: being free from the Empire requires renouncing its tech.

              We don’t care about 50 years computers. We care about a 50 years computing. Some reliable way to do computey stuff that we can build upon and preserve in the long term. It’s okay for the hardware to break down, as long as renewing it doesn’t burn or depletes our planet (global warming, finite resources, small stuff), and our data (including our programs) can be ported over to a new unit (unlike poor StarWars’ droid minds).

              I believe this starts with software. You want to make computers learnable? Then we need human sized systems. Not the two hundred million lines (10K books) of code a typical consumer device will rely on, and takes 200 years for even a genius to read. We need something like 1 book, like Nilkaus Wirth’s Oberon system, or the STEPS project. Something small, capable, and cheap. We should be able to run it on emulators, virtual machines… or older computers, with something like Y2K capabilities.

              Oh, and forget about backward compatibility. We can keep IP, TCP, and UDP, everything else is up for discussion.

              On the hardware side, we should look into how to do the most with the least. The most extreme hardcore among us might restrict themselves to TTY or CMOS logic gates, or sufficiently reversed engineered FPGA chips that can be programmed with Free Software only. We should almost certainly have direct hardware support for common tasks that would otherwise have prohibitive performance requirements: cryptography, error correction, encoding…

              On the form factor side, I like the idea of being able to just hold my screen in front of my eye like a book. I also like the ability to do that and type text. At the same time, I mean. And for this I have an idea that I’ve seen tried only once, in an obscure picture I can no longer find: put the keyboard on the back of the screen. Each hand would have its own half, oriented to match its natural orientation (so the rows would be close to vertical). This likely requires a 60% keyboard or less with a couple layers, but I could dream about typing on it as fast as I am typing now.

              Such a keyboard would be bulky of course, so we could imagine sliding the screen on and off it at will. One ideal computer to try this on I believe would be a Nintendo switch.

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                Good feedback. I need to put a warning about it on the readme.

                1.  

                  Kicking off a new project at work, attempting to bootstrap myself with Racket for Advent of Code without interrupting my ongoing Rust attempt

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                    I don’t have giant screens “so they can consume me while I consume media” you self-righteous prick, I have them so I can switch windows using my eyes, because they’re fast and built-in.

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                      That’s interesting, and blessedly short :) But not a very strong argument for the general case IMO, it basically boils down to the standard “it’s basically a goto therefore bad, QED”. But these constructs are not GOTO, and to claim they are equivalent requires overlooking all the aspects of traditional GOTO that were the most important reasons it’s considered harmful.

                      1.  

                        Those are historical precedents, not actual benefits of the restriction. If you’re setting a result value, now instead of looking for multiple return statements you’re scanning the combinatorial explosion of all possible paths within the function looking for places where the result might have been set. Doesn’t seem at all better to me. And as for “not setting the return value at all” that’s only an argument in the no-longer-common result var languages, it’s impossible to do so if you have to return a value when you return.

                        1.  

                          Just because something has failure modes doesn’t mean it’s security theater. TLS is also useless in the face of server key compromise, but I don’t think anyone would argue that TLS is security theater.

                          1.  

                            This may bring some of my users back to k9

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                              Isn’t that just looks like any other email client, such as gmail?

                              1.  

                                Your concerns are all about text entry.

                                As a programmer, I get the most power by being able to enter text. I understand that some tools allow people to create effectively on a touch screen: I saw an artists work on drawings, I saw my youngest brother build an animation through what looked like a Bret Victor-esque scripting engine with an effectiveness that seemed to exceed my own skills with an IDE . But to make or modify those, we need text.

                                Text entry, I believe, is a requirement to general computation.

                                It is also the hardest thing to sell: while better screens are just better, better text entry methods require learning. That’s why we’re still stuck with QWERTY (I’m not, but this is a source of friction). If we’re in it for the long run, text input is probably the thing we should think about the hardest.

                                1.  

                                  This is kinda cute, but please make sure your employer is OK with sending their code to OpenAI researchers before using this at work! :-)

                                  1.  

                                    I thought this was what “textwidth” was for?

                                    " set overall column width
                                    set columns=90
                                    " For all filetype text files set 'textwidth' to 78 characters and add an 85 column highlight line
                                    autocmd FileType text setlocal textwidth=78 colorcolumn=85
                                    
                                    1.  
                                      Date: Mon, 05 Dec 2022 19:32:18 UTC
                                      
                                      -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
                                      Hash: SHA256
                                      
                                                             FreeBSD 12.4-RELEASE Announcement
                                      
                                         Date: December 5, 2021
                                      

                                      I made a similar typo in a release announcement date once and it confused people just as much as this one confused me. :)

                                      1.  

                                        I can’t unfortunately, it doesn’t seem to have an “edit” button. I believe it needs moderator access or something.

                                        1. 5

                                          I would fix that Wikipedia article, but you (or the others in the discussion) seem to be better prepared to come up with correct wording, so I most humbly encourage someone to take a whack at it, in the spirit of encouraging people to get involved. Don’t worry, you won’t get reverted. (Probably. I’ll take a look if that happens.)