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    Thanks Tao! There are some challenges to selling, as you described in the post: it has to be used on new projects, it is open source so they can host it themselves if they wish. But then there is also managed hosting, support, additional products on top -> most big open source projects successfully monetize this way. And there is this notion of “monopoly” as you said - with solution like this, it is important to be stable and well spoken of to be used by a lot of people, that is a barrier to entry but it also means it is equally hard for others.

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      there’s a previous thread somewhere discussing if self-posting should be permitted or not, there’s definitely arguments for both sides. some users routinely post their own site and it’s just really uninteresting stuff (including this post), but I don’t think that’s spam— it’s just content I’m not interested in personally.

      Also, there’s a user script for hiding posts from a domain/user/whatever. someone linked it to me in a previous thread but the story was nuked.

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        That is true, for most complex heuristics a pathological counter-example can be found that breaks its assumptions.

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          I think ewintr’s comment here puts it nicely: artificial limitations might degrade the overall experience with dumb workarounds.

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            You can render an svg from css by setting background-image?

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              It’s well written work, yes it’s posted regularly, but that doesn’t make it blog spam. The submissions tend to see engagement, so I think there’s some level of consensus there amongst the community.

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                Spam is low effort, low quality, high volume. This is none of those things.

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                  [stack machines] map so poorly to modern hardware…

                  Djb argues that stack machines can be optimal if implemented and used right.

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                    I think this should be the guideline and nothing else. Voting is the system that was designed to evaluate how well content fits here. Adding requirements only inhibits people from participating, because then they have to do other things as a chore (post content from other domains, make more comments on other submissions, etc) before they can post. On top of that, the quality of those contributions will probably be lower and they will degenerate the conversation too.

                    To take it to the extreme: let’s say I post an article from my own blog each day for a month and each one of them gains a massive amounts of upvotes, why should that not be allowed? The community clearly likes it. If, on the other hand, I post three articles in a year and all three fail to collect votes and only generate negative comments, then that is an indication that the content is not appropriate for this site and it is too much, even at that rate.

                    Now, the voting system might not be perfect, but if that is the case/the problem, let’s figure out a way to improve that.

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                      Wait, everyone doesn’t add passphrases to their SSH keys & use their SSH agent to not have to type it in all the time?! Yeah that’s a disaster waiting to happen. Add passphrases to your keys! Use ssh-add!

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                        A qualitatively good article every two weeks is hardly spam in my opinion.

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                          Added support for wxWebView.

                          So, theoretically, we can somewhat self-host our Phoenix apps. Finally, a UI. :|

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                            What’s up with these web pages that don’t actually contain their content? Why should I run some javascript in order to read some text?

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                              modern XMPP clients are quite feature-ful and pleasant to use, though still behind the various proprietary platforms in some ways. It still, however, remains possible to participate on clients operating against a reduced feature-set

                              imagine the following situation:

                              • you use an xmpp client that is very simple, it only supports plaintext
                              • you send a question to someone
                              • they send their answer as an animated gif
                              • your xmpp client does not support animated gif, you are not able to read the answer.
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                                Yeah I found out about it later. But by then I had got the parsing bug.

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                                  One DNS issue I’ve had to debug before is where there are several DNS servers and one of them is responding with the wrong value. So I look up the relevant NS records and then query each of them individually to see if there’s a mismatch.

                                  Another thing I’ve cared about in the past is split horizon DNS, where a particular server has one A record on the public internet and a different A record inside our LAN so it could be seen from both. (In retrospect, perhaps doing this with routing entries to make the external IP address with on our LAN would have been better?)

                                  It comes up rarely but “I’m testing our in house custom DNS server software before we deploy it” (yeah that sounds like a bad idea, doesn’t it? It was.) so obvs I wanna send queries to it instead of the live NS servers.

                                  The last common use I can think of was “dig +trace $name” to quickly get a view of the whole chain from TLD on down. Used to use this to diagnose issues where there were 3 oe more levels of domain servers.

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                                    I’ve already commented on the /r/crypto submission, but just wanted to make sure I also mention here: these are absolutely great points that any crypto library should, at least, take into consideration.

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                                      One argument I can think of that would be in favour of such heuristics, would be that there is no real harm in having a timeout on when you can post an article from a domain again. Will anything really change is you have to wait a day or two?

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                                        An approximated summary based on titles of video segments [?], for people who don’t want/can’t watch the video now:

                                        • “Language spec”
                                        • “Self-hosted compiler”
                                        • “[Merging & discussing PRs and helping people get unstuck - good PRs can also influence our priorities]”
                                        • “LLVM [got a new] release[, we need to rebase/update]”
                                        • “Official package manager”
                                        • “Zig (Bug) Stability Program”

                                        then the video proceeds to a Q&A apparently taking ~30min of the ~50min video, so there might be some notable content there too.

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                                          Such an automated system to limit the submissions for a domain, or any other heuristics, could be tricky to balance. Probably it’s best left to the community through reports. Though I don’t know if other’s methodology for reporting is as thorough as yours.