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    There’s also ConVer (content versioning) which uses git commit hashes, although the fact that I can no longer find a link to the site/article probably speaks to how popular that idea is.

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      The open source community already has this and it’s called Thumbor

      http://www.thumbor.org/

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        I wish I too hadn’t destroyed my brain playing video games all the time up until I was 18, 19. What a horrible, horrible fate.

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          Safari blocks third party cookies already. It’s likely your “analytics” are already incorrect.

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            A sane versioning scheme […] That was easy.

            No, semver is probably not the final solution.

            From what I understood one problem is when you want to order versions. For example, you specify a dependency as “>=2.7”. Now is that condition fulfilled for “2.7-beta”? Is “2.7-beta” earlier or later than “2.7-rc3”?

            Also, there is CalVer which uses dates. Example: Ubuntu 18.04 (meaning April 2018). Also ComVer a simplified SemVer.

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              I always feel bad when reading articles like these, because it makes me feel incompetent, even though I know that that is not what it is supposed to be about ._.

              When I was 12/13 I played video games, and that one of my greatest regrets, an absolute waste of time and interest. Since then I’ve mostly stopped, trying to play them again really makes me tiered.

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                looks like a dream

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                  He seems to have pushed the tendency of ‘If it doesn’t exist, I’ll make it myself’ to his conclusion of it. I’m impressed by the drive, energy and achievement of it, even when it comes down to being a giant pile of yak shaving.

                  It is very interesting how despite all those shaved yaks and custom tools invented, it all comes down to email, and audio. They seem to be the far most stable interfaces we have. Everything else can be as custom as it gets, those will likely stay the same.

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                    Woho, that’s pretty impressive! I wish Jackson a life of discovery and delight!:) Also kudos to the parents for supporting that!

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                      Mathematics is discovered. Technology is built.

                      This statement is in my opinion too general to have any useful meaning or validity.

                      I however find your distinction between discovery and invention (building) interesting, so I’d like to ask you a question. Consider a new real world programming language L. It would probably be very easy to argue that L was invented. Assume now that a user of L stumbles upon a quirk in the way L handles closures for example. Is this quirk an invention or a discovery?

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                        Getting situated again, and trying to tackle my now-massive reading list without forgetting things because I’m reading too fast. Generally doing things more slowly has been wonderful advice recently.

                        Also have some new blog posts to draft, and my life to declutter. Moving overseas as soon as USCIS wills it makes me look very differently at buying things I won’t be able to move, and also makes me incredibly critical of the stuff I already have. I think I’ve tossed out about five rubbish bags so far, and it still feels like there is so much stuff everywhere.

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                          its confidential ;D

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                            is possible stored file and meybe git repository on public places? WWW comments, pastebin, twitter, blogs etc.

                            Imagine infinite disk and…. anonimity

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                              I’m in Barcelona working on the final touches to a product demo installation at a telecoms trade show. I’ve written an erlang app that talks to a bunch of animated hardware mechanisms, synchronizing them (well, their controllers) with web apps posing as native UIs on a range of devices positioned in a series of animated dioramas. So e.g. for one gadget that does things at different times of day, we have a lighting rig and a video screen showing the arc of a day, synced up really tightly with what’s happening on the product’s screen. Basically a series of state machine processes mediating & ensuring correct conversations between browsers and physical machinery via websockets, eventsource, UDP and serial-over-USB. Really nice project, hoping to wangle more of this kind of work with clients who’ll let me use erlang.

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                                Related to privacy enhancements I always wonder what the effect on perceived user numbers are, because I would argue that on average Firefox, Linux, BSD, etc. users might be a lot more security minded.

                                Of course this is also true for Internet Explorer setting DNT per default.

                                While I don’t think the difference is enormous one has to keep in mind that a big factor of various statistics about the web (Alexa, Browserstats, Netcraft, …) are browser bars which not too rarely are installed by people not unchecking boxes in “freeware”.

                                Again, while I don’t think it makes a huge difference overall I once tried using these browser extensions and was able to produce thousands of users for an empty page that only was hit by me and some bots according to the access logs. This of course was a completely unscientific experiment, but it worked for that test website as well as a blog that didn’t have any third party content or Javascript, but isn’t small visitor wise at all. According to websites like Alexa and others visitors from my country all of a sudden were the major part which I consider unlikely to just have happened during that test.

                                On the other hand Chrome has a lot of intention to be tracked at least by Google to show leads to a certain page by the search engine or advertisements, since that’s where the money comes from.

                                While I don’t think manually changing settings makes a huge difference of the overall picture, I think defaults certainly can have, so I’d imagine not having cookies can either have an impact of not being tracked or being tracked multiple times, as since people are maybe not recognized to have visited. While I know that cookies aren’t the only way here they might still be a factor.

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                                  I’m also happy to see stuff like may which provide stackful coroutines without very much cruft at all. Async/await will also be another huge win for cruft-reduction in the async space. As someone who writes large codebases in Rust, I tend to stay away from the current stable async stuff in most cases (unless I write my own simple thing directly on top of mio) due to the stack explosions and general code complexity issues that pop up for little gain over threads unless you’re building a load balancer. Many people are not building load balancers, but get pulled into the async hype because it’s what gets blogged about, and then they end up with combinator chains 7 indentations deep and it takes them 6 hours to change a line of business logic. Async/await will mean that they get to live in a hyped ecosystem (which can be really fun, and fun is a major factor for sustained productivity) without nearly so much ergonomic strain. If you want to look at the future, check out the romio crate which is tokio adapted for the upcoming world of async-await, and is a pleasure to work with.

                                  Other than choosing the wrong tool for the job, I think a big issue, which rust could do better about as well, is the 3-pages-of-errors due to being unable to unify code that doesn’t typecheck. The way that rust does type inference is by starting with the function’s arguments and return type, and working one step at a time in both directions (down based on arguments, up based on return type) through the function body. This is one of the reasons why rust can’t infer the type arguments for functions. But as a result of this, if a bunch of code in the middle of a function is invalid because there is a gap in the “evidence chain” about what it should be, then it will emit errors about it all. For this reason, the most efficient way to debug these long pages of errors is to start at the edge of unification, and either work your way down or up from there. I usually pipe cargo’s output into head because I only care about the first one most of the time, but this is tribal knowledge, and maybe it’s possible for the compiler to reduce its volume a little bit, and stick to the current edge of unification in some cases.

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                                    This was a nice read. CHIP-8 suffers from a chronic lack of development tools and whatnot, but this has the nice advantage that one can write them himself; that’s what I’ve been doing lately, as well, and why this caught my attention. The only practical, modern, and easy to use CHIP-8 implementation I was familiar with was Octo, but I’m glad that I’ll be able to use this from now on once I inspect it.

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                                      Swedish has “svåger” for husband of sibling, and “svägerska” for wife of sibling. Gender of sibling is irrelevant so it’s easy to adjust for same-sex marriages ;)

                                      We also have specific words for the parents of parents depending on the parent’s gender, so “morfar” is maternal grandfather, while “farmor” is paternal grandmother.

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                                        When I was studying calculus and mechanics the names always seemed kind of contemporary, so I mentally placed these dudes around the middle of the 19th century. Of course it turns out most undergrad math was hashed out by around mid-18th century ^[citation needed].

                                        Apart from the really famous dudes like Descartes, Newton, and Gauss/Euler I’ve never really studied the bios of many of the famou names in maths or mechanics.

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                                          No. She has retinitis pigmentosa so it’s a gradual degeneration. She can read by greatly magnifying text but it’s tiring.