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    CGI programs could be anything. You could write them in a shell script on an HP-UX or Irix box. You could write them in C. Netscape tried to make money selling server software where you could write them in JavaScript (and oh how everyone laughed).

    And now look at us!

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      I think people stopped using Perl for new stuff because all of the things it did best are now done in other languages, in less obscure ways.

      At one time, Perl was the only popular language that was super dynamic and had things like regular expressions and string interpolation, and it had a ton of libraries, too. The down side is you had to put up with things like “sigils” on variables and obscure hidden variables, and weird variables contexts, and other pains in the ass.

      Nowadays, most other languages have borrowed the cool stuff from Perl, usually with cleaner syntax and without all the pains in the ass that Perl had.

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        This is what happened to me. I discovered Perl, and was amazed at all the dynamic stuff. Then four or five years later, I discovered Ruby, and said “This is everything I loved about Perl without everything I hate.” Never really touched Perl again. I did get tattoos of both languages' logos…

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          Pics?

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            Ruby: http://imgur.com/4sf4xIQ

            I actually don’t have a picture of the perl camel handy, and am lazy, so that’s all you get for now. :)

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          Perl was the only popular language that was super dynamic and had things like regular expressions and string interpolation, and it had a ton of libraries, too. The down side is you had to put up with things like “sigils” on variables and obscure hidden variables, and weird variables contexts, and other pains in the ass.

          Makes me wonder how Perl ever beat TCL in the first place - just the familiar syntax?

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            Just speculation, but I think “everything is a string” may have turned a lot of people off of TCL.

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              Same. The few times I’ve used TCL in the network security space, I’ve really liked it.