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    Wow this is really incredible. Makes me want to learn Racket.

    MUST… RESIST… URGE TO CHASE BRIGHT SHINY!!!

    :)

    Years from now when I reach near Expert level Python Racket or Clojure are definitely my next language choice.

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      Check out https://beautifulracket.com/ you might like it.

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        NOOOOOO ahem Thanks :) I filed that away for a time when I can use it guilt free :)

        I know being LASER focused and not branching out at all seems counter-intuitive in this polyglot world of 2019 but I spent years mastering NOTHING and as such my core skills never got to where they needed to be. My rigid blinders around anything non Python have paid off in a huge way already so I’m sticking with it for the nonce :)

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        it’s a really pleasant language! i highly recommend it. in particular, if you ever want to develop a small cross-platform gui app with high developer productivity it’s one of the best tools i’ve found for the job.

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          When you say small GUI are there patent limitations? (lack of useful widgets?)

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            it doesn’t have as much in the way of widgets as e.g. qt does, though it has all the standard ones and a canvas so you can make your own. another drawback is that there aren’t that many people writing gui apps in it, so even though it is relatively straightforward to create custom widgets, in practice there is a poor specialised widget ecosystem (e.g. there’s a map widget because someone made one, but i couldn’t find a date picker/calendar widget in a brief search).

            it also suffers from a lack of niceties like theming, and misses features like accessibility and internationalisation. see this bug for more. the gui framework was largely developed to build the drracket ide, and that tends to show in a lot of places.

            on the other hand it really does make it easy to write a quick gui app for some small, specialised task. the main hurdle again is that there are not many tutorials and examples out there, so getting started can be a bit slow, but once you get familiar with the basic gui framework it’s a pleasure to use. and it has some surprising widgets, such as a hypertext widget where the links call back into racket code, and a 3d renderer.

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              Thanks! It’s exactly what I thought about Ltk (I’m turning to the IUP bindings now).

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                from racket? i think i tried once and had trouble getting them working; if you can’t then the chicken scheme binding is well worth checking out.

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                  hey sorry, no I tested the Common Lisp bindings (ltk and IUP).

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            Racket seems rather unique in that it’s a Scheme with an unusual bent towards solving real world problems, and it seems to have a really vibrant community of people doing just that and providing a really solid and diverse library ecosystem.

            I look forward to learning it… In the future :)

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          I enjoy these type of posts, but I had to laugh at “It loads in milliseconds. No one does that anymore”, because quite to the contrary it seems that everyone is trying this again now.

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            As someone that also makes very small websites (well, I make them not-big, more than as small as possible), I’m curious as to what throttling methods were used to test this load time? Was it just a low amount of kb/s download? Did it include network latency of any sort?

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              I understood it to be the network throttling feature built in to browsers’ developer tools.

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                Right, but that tool is configurable, and he doesn’t state what configuration he’s using.

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                  Oh yeah. Ignore my brain fart. I guess the lack of numbers and invitation to try it yourself is from the author’s confidence in the server being able to quickly produce small amounts of data. Doesn’t sound too impressive phrased like that, though…

                  (Network latency isn’t under their control so there’s no use measuring it.)