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    Ah, OSNews, it used to be my home-base in early aughts when the idea of the alternative OSes getting some mainstream acceptance weren’t so crazy.

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      These days it’s mostly rants against Apple - which I do not mind - but often unfortunately based on incorrect knowledge. Some unnecessary and unwelcome “woke” politics have crept in, too.

      It’s sad how it degraded, but there’s still interesting posts once in a while, so I still track it via RSS.

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      There’s a market for a Psion III like device done with modern tech.

      And for some reason, no company seems to want to supply this market.

      Current tech would allow for higher resolution and better contrast display, faster cpu, faster/larger storage and ram, lower power draw (order of magnitude) and higher capacity battery.

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        There’s the Planet Computers Gemini PDA where apparently some Psion folks were involved.

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          That device is (literally) irrelevant.

          Android-based, backlit screen, high performance but low battery life… it is literally a smartphone with a keyboard.

          It absolutely isn’t a Psion III successor.

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            The OS could be swapped out, Symbian (the successor to Psion’s SIBO) is open source. Feel free to do that and encourage people to adapt their software to it, good luck.

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              It wouldn’t fix the hardware. A smartphone with a keyboard is no Psion III successor.

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                Then what would it be? The endgame for Psion was to clearly end up being a smartphone. The Series 3 and 5 were PDAs with a keyboard (see also: HPCs). The later Communicator devices running Symbian were obviously the successor to it, and they were smartphones with a keyboard. The Windows Mobile PDA market got stagnant, then creamed by… Windows Mobile smartphones.

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                  The later Communicator devices running Symbian were obviously the successor to it, and they were smartphones with a keyboard.

                  Yes, that’s when they were derailed. There’s no true successor for the 5. That’s where it ends. The newer devices are designed to be network terminals, not pocket computers.

                  Then what would it be?

                  Another clamshell device with keyboard and non-illuminated screen, but built with current components.

                  That would allow for a more readable screen, faster cpu, much more ram and storage, perhaps some wireless connectivity via BLE (I’d appreciate a clock synchronization feature!), and yet dramatically lower power consumption than the old models, and thus longer battery life.

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                    You started this thread by saying “there’s a market” for this. But the thing you just described… I literally can’t even imagine who would buy that outside the realm of retro computing enthusiasts (which includes me). Just because people like you and I think it would be neat to mess around with (and you apparently think it would be useful in a more general sense) doesn’t necessarily mean that there is a market large enough to justify mass production.

                    The problem, in my mind, is that there’s going to be a dealbreaker for almost everyone. Is there a <blank> app for this hypothetical device? No? That means the user still has to carry around their phone. They’re not carrying around two devices. The phone wins. Same comparison works for small laptops.

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                      I literally can’t even imagine who would buy that outside the realm of retro computing enthusiasts (which includes me).

                      Another perspective would be: The smartphone market is saturated, whereas this niche is here for whoever wants to take it.

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                        Just because a niche exists, doesn’t mean it’s big enough to make money from it…