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    I read the first few paragraphs, and I still have no idea what kind of product this is about, other than having something to do with git. Background information is useful, but you may want to start by giving a concise explanation of what the product actually is before going in to details.

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      Thank you for the feedback. It does so many different things that it’s challenging to distill it into a concise explanation. I’ll see if I can do better.

      Update: Added a second paragraph with a bunch of links to specific examples. Hopefully it helps?

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        Not really, how does providing a commit browser (github/gitlab/cgit does that) and a directory browser (github/gitlab/cgit does that) make it easier to contribute?

        HOW does it lower the barrier?

        Clicking around I don’t see any immediate benefit. If it’s supposed to be good for beginners, maybe experienced people don’t see it because the other tools are well-known and kinda ok?

        Scrolling down, you seem to explain that yours is supposed to be better, but that should be in the first few paragraphs. Also why did you break my ctrl-click to open in a new tab?

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          Thank you for the feedback. Our hope is that a commit browser makes life easier for contributors by way of giving them a high level overview of where code is getting written in the project (+ which issues are currently being implemented by those commits). Using the commits list in Github is an inefficient way to be able to browse code and while keeping a sense for how it all connects. If you have time to use the commit browser and actually click into some diffs / browse through recent commits, hopefully the benefits will become clearer

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      And here I thought - and hoped - this was about https://openrepos.net/content/basil/about-openrepos

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        Why? I see nothing here that truly makes it easier to contribute to a project. It takes little time to learn git, and another clicky GUI doesn’t seem to make things easier. The classic comic applies here.

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          It might have some nice features, but there is a significant ethical problem. The development of free software (or open source if you wish) should be done using free (as in freedom) tools and should not depend on proprietary software or services.

          Indeed, this is not only ethical problem – such dependency/addiction has also practical negative impacts.

          P.S. if that product itself is free software, I take my comment back, but your website does not say that it is free and where I can find the source codes (at least at the first sight).

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            Here franta, here’s the relevant paragraph from our over-long announcement about this:

            Open Repos is free for users, and shall remain so forevermore. 🎁

            We secondarily offer a paid commercial service, but one needn’t use it to access/view, or create new Open Source repos for processing

            It is accurate that we are a proprietary service, but so is Github, and they’ve still managed to do a lot to advance open source development in spite of it. The proprietary commercial offering helps keep the lights on.

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              This is why I wrote „free (as in freedom)“ – I have no problem with paying for a service (especially if it helps someone I like and want to support) but I am avoiding proprietary software and services. To understand my point of view, you can read Sane software manifesto which describes it pretty well.

              Proprietary centralized services like GitHub are harmful, despite it might look that they help… Generally putting all your eggs in one basket is not a good idea.

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            When a full stack developer with 8 weeks of training can command a salary comparable to a general practice doctor with 8 years of training

            If this is true, I want a raise, now, or I quit. Full stop.

            (It’s not true, eh?)

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              You’re correct that I wasn’t especially rigorous in gauging exact differences. To ensure I’m not too far off base about this, I looked up physician salaries in Seattle (https://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Family_Physician_%2F_Doctor/Salary/53da5ca3/Seattle-WA) which look to start from $80k for 10th percentile. Same site says that 10th percentile for Seattle developers is $73k. I don’t think the difference are too great. Especially relative to the differences in training years required.

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                I’m more concerned about somebody with 8 weeks of training getting compensation anywhere near what I get with 15 years of legit on-the-job experience. Not to mention it’s more like 25 years if you choose to account for all that time I spent in front of screens before I was paid for it.

                I’m not saying somebody can’t take a course, upgrade their career, and attribute that success to the course.. But I am saying that the attribution might not be deserved. If that person gets $80k, they must have had some previous experience that was somehow relevant.. they must have pivoted from some other technical role.. right?

                Or do I just need a #$^@% raise. :/

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                  Or do I just need a #$^@% raise. :/

                  I’m not familiar with the Seattle market specifically (or your areas of specialty), but that looks like a really, absurdly low rate for 15 years.

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                    I’m in Omaha, Nebraska.

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                      The other relevant part of the market is the kind of work that you do.

                      In my experience:

                      Low pay: Web agency work, videogames development

                      Medium pay: Firmware dev, cost-centre corporate work

                      High pay: Profit-centre corporate work

                      Very high pay: Domain specialist with programming knowledge (someone who does not need an analyst to explain the customers needs)

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                        State Health Department. :)

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                    I mean, we should all encourage higher salaries in our profession. If a person with 8 weeks of experience gets $80k, then someone with 15 years should be making north of $150k, right? A rising tide raises all boats.

                    If you are making the same amount of money as a new grad in your area, you are absolutely being underpaid and need to consider switching companies.

                    I’m in the Seattle area: hired 5ish years ago at $65k, got $20k in raises at $JOB1, got another $20k when I moved jobs. That seems normal in my peer group. (Not working for Amazon out the gate, they can start at $100k).

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                Can I use this for my public and open source repositories? The URL goes to a place that only seems to let me look ReactJS and popular jQuery plugins.

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                  You bet – aiding the maintainers is at the top of our objectives list. The best way to go about it is to log in via Github and then visit the page to request a new Open Repo import: https://www.gitclear.com/open_repo_requests/new

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                    Sorry, permissions are too broad, I’m not giving you access to my private repositories. You don’t need that to run a report on a public repository.

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                      This always bothers me.

                      I’ve ended up moving all my private repos into organisations so just so I can grant access to my public ones.