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    A funny thing I realized a while back is that, for me, there’s very little difference between Linux and the BSDs, and to some extent even OSX.

    Most of the software I use on a daily basis (Emacs, StumpWM, SBCL, Chromium, rxvt, zsh, etc.) is virtually identical between systems. There are some nuances, like GNU vs BSD userland tools, but for the most part it doesn’t affect me much.

    OSX has a different UI, but even there most of my time is spent in Emacs, Chromium, or the terminal (with zsh), so it ends up being nearly the same, too.

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      I feel that’s only true for the time spent coding? As soon as you have to deploy or manage a service/system, things get interesting. Though I guess it’s less of a problem for any kind of code that only runs locally?

      Lobsters has me all hyped for OpenBSD, and there’s openbsd.amsterdam now offering VMs, which is really interesting. But at the same time, I don’t want to spend a lot of time on the maintenance of private little side-projects. I currently take a single VM from a generic provider, run Debian on it, and set it update and reboot automatically. If I can get to that point with OpenBSD, I’d be even more interested in trying. (But I’ve only spent a little time researching so far.)

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        I feel that’s only true for the time spent coding? As soon as you have to deploy or manage a service/system, things get interesting. Though I guess it’s less of a problem for any kind of code that only runs locally?

        Yeah, I suppose that’s true, but almost everything I write lately is just loaded into a Lisp image and launched from the REPL, so it’s largely the same every where.

        I think administration is definitely where there are the biggest user noticeable differences between all the systems.

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        Unix is Unix. I no longer really draw distinctions, because they are largely meaningless for the level at which I interact with systems.

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        A better test bed. Although my work focus on developing programs on Linux, I will try to compile and run applications on OpenBSD if it is possible.

        I feel like the lack of valgrind does hurt OpenBSD as a testbed. I know there’s malloc.conf(5), but that doesn’t seem to help much in the case of, say, out of bounds access of a stack-allocated variable.

        a) Patches. Although most of them are trivial modifications, they are still my contributions.

        Don’t claim it’s just trivialities. The small things and adding polish is what really makes OpenBSD stand out (or any software project, really), and every “trivial” modification helps.

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          OpenBSD does have Valgrind.

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            I stand corrected. Oops. Thank you.

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              What about ASan and the other sanitizers?

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            One thing I wish could be easily ported to Linux from OpenBSD is relayd. In my constant excirse for minimalism and simplicity I’ve felt in love with suckless’ ii irc client, because its interface is pure text with tons of possibilities, I don’t need to run something depending on ncurses; but ii by design lacks of SSL or TLS functionalities (I like that) so they suggest to use a proxy that makes the connection for it, in OpenBSD relayd takes care flawlessly of the job, but there is nothing equivalent on Linux land, for the moment since I’m stuck on GNU/Linux I have to use socat with a named pipe.

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              stunnel?

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                That’s the one I needed, perhaps I was too tired late at night looking for proxy-only terms. Thank you for suggesting it, I will certainly try it whenever I get home, and see how it behaves.