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Sorry for being late this time! I’ll try to liveblog in the comments.

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    still need to catch up on what I missed

    • Tim Cook announces some more media stuff, including an alt-hist space race show from the creator of Battlestar Galactica.

    • Apple TV Plus looks like a streaming service.

    • Starting with tvOS?

    • Redesigned homescreen with autoplay like Netflix when you turn it on. Personalized “up next” and recommendations. Multi-user support. Control centre like iOS for switching between accounts and other sundry tasks. Apple Music applies to that too. Lyrics synchronized with time. (Karaoke, anyone?)

    • Gaming on tvOS. Xbox One and PS4 controller support.

    • Underwater screensaver, courtesy of the BBC.

    • Watch time. New watchOS? Kevin on stage.

    • Watch faces. More of them.

    • Taptic chimes - audible/feelable chimes from the haptic feedback, every hour.

    • Apps. First-party now include audiobooks and voice memos. And Calculator - take that, iPad!

    • Independent watch apps, untethered from specific iPhone applications. Standalone streaming API.

    • App Store on Apple Watch.

    • More health and fitness. Doctor Sumbul on stage. It’s for your health! Activity trends. Hearing protection that detects environmental dB. (It doesn’t record or save audio, just a periodic check.)

    • For the women: Cycle tracking. Also on iOS. Back to Kevin. Improved health app on iOS, with more summaries available. Oooooooh, machine learning. Stored on local device or encrypted in iCloud, sharing is explicit and optional.

    • Haley on stage. More watchOS, demo of what was introduced. Back to Kevin. Shazam built in? Automatic updates? More bands, including a Pride one.

    • iOS time with Tim. Last year was 12. 97% satisfaction? 85% updated to iOS 12. Versus 10% on Android 9. Craig on stage now.

    • iOS 13. Performance. 30% faster face ID unlock. App store packaging format change. 50% smaller download, 60% smaller for updates. Double app launch speed.

    • Jellyfish? Dark theme, for those of you who care. Looks like a true black for OLED. Everything gets adjusted aesthetically for the dark.

    • Swiping keyboard. Sharing suggestion on the share sheet. Depeche Mode reference. Apple Music does the time-sync lyrics on iOS too.

    • Apps: Safari, Mail, Notes. Per-website prefs and better text zoom. Mail has better rich formatting. Photos has better folders and sharings. Reminders rewrite. More “instant’ UI metaphors in it. Integration with Messages, hierarchy changes, etc.

    • Maps improvements. They have planes and cars with LIDAR. Full US coverage by 2019, other countries next year. Meg on stage for demo. 3D objects on map. Improved launch screen with favourites and collections. Street view? Seems more fluid than Google’s, and you can interact with POIs in street view. Sharing and junction view.

    • Yes, it’s private and secure. Restricting location permissions. One-shot permissions for location. Reporting for location permissions usage. Blocking BT/Wifi based location scanning. Social media logins are kinda bad for privacy. Apple-based SSO instead? No tracking. Uses Face ID, doesn’t reveal PII unless user consents to share name and email. If not, it makes a burner email that forwards to your real one, per app. Available on all Apple OSes and the web.

    • HomeKit. Privacy on IoT tat, particularly cameras. So many cameras use cloud based things, and risks privacy. HomeKit secure video, uses local iOS devices to perform the ML junk and uses encrypted iCloud to store if needed. 10 days of storage free, doesn’t count against data storage. Devices on internet suck. HomeKit in routers will firewall off individual devices.

    • Messages. You can share name/picture when sending messages to new people. More memoji customization. They’re on stickers now, if you care. They’ll work outside of iMessage? Animation of them requires a new device still, but they can be displayed and edited on any A9 or newer device now.

    • Camera improvements. Better portrait lighting. “high-key mono?” Editing. Effects stack and are editable. Works on video too. Filters and rotations work there. Better browsing. Picture of paper/whiteboards can be annoying if you browse pictures. It can filter them out of a photo stream. Justin on stage for the demo of new Photos. Days: It’s a big grid you can navigate, and refine. Months groups by event. Years is context-sensitive.

    • Voice stuff uses Siri, even if you use HomePod/AirPods/CarPlay. Stacy on stage. It can interrupt things you listen to for notifications you can instantly respond to and then return from. Audio sharing. Handoff for HomePod. Live radio. It knows who is talking and personalizes accordingly. 90% CarPlay availability in US, 75% globally. CarPlay dashboard layout change. Adaptive. Siri Shortcuts. Suggestions for multi-step shortcuts. MACHINE LEARNING, DRINK. Neural TTS, instead of pre-recorded. Should improve voice quality.

    • Back to Craig. Some more stuff they didn’t touch on, like call spam prevention, enterprise SSO, and low data mode.

    • Where’d iPad go? It’s special…. it’s now iPad OS. Icon density. Widgets on home screen. Multitasking, slideover. Can peek into another application. Split view. Multi-window for applications. Same app, just split. Works for multiple spaces. Expose on iPad. Works for third-party applications, including Word. Demo with Mail, turning a popover into a split with two mail windows. Files app improvements. Miller columns now! iCloud Drive folder sharing, and…. SMB? USB sticks and SD cards too. Direct camera imports into Lightroom and such. Safari is desktop-class now? Things like Google Docs work too. Download manager, keyboard shortcuts, and more.

    • Fonts. Custom fonts! Download from the app store. Multi-touch text editing. Grabbable scroll indicator. Drag cursor. Drag a selection. Three-finger pinch copy, three-finger spread to paste. Three finger swipe for Undo.

    • Pencil. It’s pretty low latency - 20ms, down to 9ms. PencilKit API. Markup on any app is easier. Screenshots and documents. Toby on stage to demo. The keyboard can be shrunk by pinching it. To cut, do the copy gesture twice. Shaking to undo still works. Gestures for all this editing should be cross-application. The markup palette is reorientable and movable and closeable. Applications opt-into the full page markup. Back to Craig.

    • Back to Tim. Mac! They love the Mac? Oh god, is it the Mac Pro? Holy shit, it looks like a cheesegrater! Like, a real one this time! Tower with a foot, but tighter than the older 2012s.

    • John on stage. Customizable. Stainless steel frame. Handles. 28-core Xeon. 300W CPU with heatsink. 2933 MHZ DDR4 ECC, 6 channels, 12 slots. 1.5 TB limit. Expansion. 8 PCIe slots. Four double-wide, three single, one half-wide populated with IO card. Dual 10 GB ethernet. Standard connector for GPU, but a second edge connector a la VLB with power and video ports wired up. Gigantic heatsink for passive cooler. Mac Pro expansion module with multiple GPUs, MPX. Multiple Radeon Pros as option, including dual Vega II on a single card. Dual slot GPUs. Afterburner card for video editing? FPGA that does 6 billion pixels per second.for ProRes codecs. No more proxies? 1400W power supply. Three large fans and one blower. Wheels. ISVs will support this, from video to games.

    • David on stage for talking about Adobe stuff on the new-new Mac Pro. And I guess a new version of Logic. Thousand tracks in parallel.

    • Back to John. New display. Colleen on stage.

    • Lots of features, all in same monitor. Reference monitors aren’t good enough. 32-inch 6K. P3, 10-bit, reference modes, pre-calibrated. Wide viewing angle. Anti-glare. Matte option, without haze and such. Better HDR with advanced backlight. The backlight would require a lot of power, but the rear acts as a heatsink. 1000 nits indefinitely, 1600 peak. 1M:1 contrast. Pro Display XDR. TB3 one-cable connectivity with MBPs. Up to six on a Mac Pro. Fancy stand with counterbalance and tilt. Portrait mode. VESA mount?

    • Back to John. Base model: 8 core, 32 GB, Radeon Pro, 580x, 256 GB SSD, 6k$. Rack mountable. 5k$ base monitor, stands and matte cost more.

    • Back to Tim. macOS. Craig on stage.

    • macOS Catalina. iTunes used to be good, then it got bloated. But people want even more! Splitting iTunes into Music, TV, and Podcasts. Sync is done from Finder instead. Machine learning, drink. You can search the audio of podcasts. 4K HDR video. And those Dolby things.

    • Sidecar. iPad as second display for Mac. Pencil works too. Wired and wireless. Support any app that supports graphics tablets.

    • a11y. Voice control. iOS too. Full dictation and control over applications. All audio stays local on device.

    • Find My…. Combines friends/Mac/Phone. Offline location finding using Bluetooth beacons as relays, E2E and anonymous. Activation lock for Macs with T2.

    • Apps. Better photo browser. Start page in Safari. Gallery view in Notes. Redesigned Reminders. Screen Time on Mac.

    • Catalyst. This is basically Marzipan. 100M Mac users. They’re improving the APIs to make it feel more Mac native. Available today. In an iPad app in Xcode, just check the Mac checkbox and it’ll add the necessary boilerplate for you to add the Mac specific parts. Games could be ported with this in addition to regular stuff. Rob from Atlassian on stage.

    • JIRA on mobile… now on Mac? Native code, I guess.

    • Back to Craig. Developers are the biggest pros. Metal and CoreML later, but for now, AR and Swift. RealityKit. What if devs want AR and such but aren’t exactly artists or gamedevs? I guess RealityKit has a native Swift API to do all that. Reality Composer has drag-and-drop and a stock 3D object library for environments. Available in Xcode and iOS. ARKit 3 has people occlusion: real-time layering behind and ahead of people of 3D objects. Real time pose tracking to be mapped into objects. Yeah, Minecraft. (Chief Brand Officer is a thing now?) Lydia and Saxs on stage. AR Minecraft, mapped into the real world. Demo. Shared world.

    • Craig. Swift. 450K App Store things in Swift. SwiftUI, a UI framework designed specifically for Swift. Declarative UI. Automatic opt-in to new features. Xcode updated to support this new stuff. Josh on stage. Real time UI preview. Drag and drop/inspectors onto the preview is reflected in code. Maps to MVC? Interactive in the preview, and instant deployment.

    • Craig back. You can go into SwiftUI piecemeal. Watch supported. And Mac. Binds to native controls and APIs.

    • Back to Tim. Concluding. Betas today. Public iOS/iPad/macOS in July. Final in Fall. Mac Pro and display demo if you’re there. Lots of labs and devs - if you’re there. Thanks to everyone at Apple.

    Fin.

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      Apple’s made it abundantly clear now that the Mac Pro and the accompanying monitor are targeted at businesses only now. It’d been almost that way with the current-gen Mac Pro being nearly $3,000, but that’s still affordable at the high-end enthusiast market. $6,000 for entry-level is out for basically anyone except businesses, especially when the monitor is another $6,000 – reportedly $1,000 just for the stand…?

      I’m a well-compensated software engineer and I feel like I don’t want to afford Mac stuff anymore. I’ve had two maxed-out˚ high-end 13” MBPs, one MBA 13”, and one MBP 15” bought from work surplus in the last 10 years and not paid more than $2,000 including AppleCare, tax, and shipping for any of them. To replace my 2015 13” MBP now would run $2,747. I considered going 15” on this refresh after using four 15” MBPs for work for the last 9 years across three employers but I don’t want to afford the nearly $4,000 for a maxed-out lower-end one.

      I’m milking this 2015 13” MBP for all it’s worth now. I built a new gaming rig over the holidays that is so much more powerful and the only reason I don’t use it as my daily driver is that I treat it as a gaming console, a refuge from the opportunity of work and “things to do” that my laptop affords. Maybe it’s time to go back to a dual-booting Windows and Linux on a desktop and use a laptop as a tool to use my desktop’s power remotely as I did 15 years ago when I sold my 15” Sager/Clevo DTR laptop and built a desktop and bought a $500 shitty laptop to use to access it through the internet. Or maybe it’s time to embrace rent-a-cloud for compute workloads (i.e. development) and use a Chromebook to access it.

      ˚ maxed-out means getting the CPU and RAM upgrades since those cannot be upgraded after purchase

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        I can’t help feeling this is a can’t-win for Apple.

        When they make stuff spec’d and priced in ranges that software developers care about, they get yelled at for abandoning the creative-professional (especially image and video) market.

        When they make a Mac Pro spec’d and priced for the creative-professional market, they get yelled at for abandoning software developers.

        I think it needs to be possible to acknowledge that their different product lines can serve different markets, and that not every product needs to have the specs or price for every market.

        And if you don’t believe me that this really is targeted at the creative market, by the way, read some of the informed commentary on what their super-high-quality monitors traditionally cost. Apple’s new display is not targeted for you to run VS Code on, it’s targeted for the professional video editors and it undercuts the usual price point by almost an order of magnitude. A couple articles I’ve read point out that it’s actually a serious threat if it turns out to be good enough, because it’ll mean everybody in the production pipeline gets to have one, instead of just the one person who does the final corrections.

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          It’s only a can’t-win if it actually hurts sales.

          Thanks for the information about the monitor.

          I think it needs to be possible to acknowledge that their different product lines can serve different markets, and that not every product needs to have the specs or price for every market.

          The question about the computer itself is whether it’s competitively priced compared to a similarly specced “PC”[1] workstation, adding some value-add in that it natively runs OS X, and has Apple-level build quality. That’s the market.

          [1] by “PC” I mean an x86 platform that can run Windows or a form of Unix.

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            That’s the market.

            Again, though, I’d argue that this isn’t quite correct, because it really does underestimate the value of the platform. A lot of the workflows in creative fields are tied, to a greater or lesser extent, to specific pieces of software that run on macOS and thus on Apple hardware. Not always for reasons that a complete outsider would view as rational or correct, but that’s just the way things are sometimes.

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              I agree, but that’s why I mentioned that offering a computer with the same raw performance as a similarly specced PC but that could run OSX natively is worth a premium. I have no idea how large that premium is.

              Off hand, I’d say that Apple could charge 10-15% more than a similarly specced PC and I’d consider it “fair”.

              When the dust settles I’ll see if I can so some research on the specs.

              Do you have a link to the discussion on the monitor, by the way?

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                The comparison people mostly are drawing – and the one Apple seems to want to draw – is to the Sony BVM-X300. Prices that come up when searching for it are rather eye-opening.

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                  B&H price page.

                  Wow… even for someone who’s used to peruse camera gear, that’s quite something…

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        Possibly the strongest WWDC show since ages. Even as a cautious and somewhat skeptical Apple user, I’m so much excited about all of what they delivered this time.

        And you know, mouse support on iPad!

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          The new matte finish on the XDR sounds interesting. Here’s hoping apple brings it as an option for laptop screens in the future again, but with the new nano-abrasion tech. I really miss having a matte screen!