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I tagged this as practices, since I think there is a lot of overlap with the skills necessary to becoming a better developer.

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    I’m terribly jealous I didn’t think to submit this; this book seriously improved my attitude towards competition, collaboration, and learning.

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      Goals for 2016

      ✅ Make @pushcx jealous

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        If everyone had the goal of submitting something that made me jealous I would actually end up thrilled. Or in whatever the oppositive of hysteresis is, oscillating between the two.

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        I found it by way of playing high level street fighter, but I’ve been quoting that book for years on all sorts of subjects. That scrub mentality affects everything.

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        I’ve just read the summary, but I’m picking up some strong echoes from The Loser’s Game by Charles D. Ellis, a 1980s article about tennis and investment:

        As a scientist and statistician, Dr. Ramo gathered data to test his hypothesis. And he did it in a very clever way. Instead of keeping conventional game scores—“Love,” “Fifteen All,” “Thirty-Fifteen,” etc.—Ramo simply counted points won versus points lost. In other words, professional tennis is a Winner’s Game—the final outcome is determined by the activities of the winner—and amateur tennis is a Loser’s Game—the final outcome is determined by the activities of the loser. The two games are, in their fundamental characteristic, not at all the same. They are opposites.

        Using the language from this post, it sounds like the scrub’s game is the loser’s game: an effort to keep a game fun at the expense of high-level play. Both forms of play have value, but mismatches can be disastrous.

        From this discovery of the two kinds of tennis, Dr. Ramo build a complete strategy by which ordinary tennis players can win games, sets and matches again and again by following the simple strategem of losing less, and letting the opponent defeat himself.

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          This makes me think of my early shockingly bad tennis games when I was about 10. I had a powerful serve because I was quite tall, but if it didn’t go in or if they got it back and we had to rally I would lose something like 80% of the points. The worst parts were the long rallies because I knew I was just putting off the inevitable. I also knew the winning strategy was patience, taking your time and being careful, but I just couldn’t apply it for whatever reason.

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          He seems like an interesting designer, as well. If anyone in Chicago would like to try out Pandante, let me know and I’ll get a game together.

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            I bounced off Sirlin’s Pandante (not open ended like Texas Hold'Em) and Puzzle Strike (not sure what happened, just never felt like we had the game in gear), but his Flash Duel and Yomi are two of my desert island games. I’ve played hundreds of games of each and I feel like I’m just getting started.

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              Just moved from Chicago to Seattle. Otherwise I would love to! By the way, you know anyone wanting to rent a house near the fox river?

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                Just moved from Seattle to Chicago! Enjoy.

                edit: Hey! How is my comment off topic and not mempko’s ? Must be a passive aggressive Seattle downvoter.

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                  I upvoted you to cancel-out whoever’s downvote. Welcome to Chicago. PM me if you’re looking for tech meetups or anything else.

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                  What brought you to move to Seattle?

                  I was planning to move to Seattle in 2014, but ended up finding a better job market in Chicago, and I’m actually quite happy that I landed here (Chicago). With the large finance sector, there’s a very strong adult (30+) job market and it’s nice to be in a big city.

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                This looks great, and just moved to the top of my reading list. I finished The Art of Learning by Josh Waitzkin about a month ago, and have been looking for another perspective on the topic. I love starting something new and being bad at it, and improving to a reasonable level, but I’ve never pushed further than that. I’ve become pretty pretty good, but not even close to pro level at a number of games (top 100 2v2 player in Warcraft 3, master league with two races in Starcraft 2, top 500 legend in Hearthstone).

                If anyone has any more recommended material on this subject, please let me know! Send me a tweet or email if you’re interested in non-comment conversation on anything mentioned.

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                  Props on top 500 legend in Hearthstone. That’s much better than what I perceive a reasonable level, as a casual. I recently made it my goal to hit legend. I’ve never been better than rank 10.

                  My recent Hearthstone goal aligns with my recent fascination with sports psychology. I can’t recommend any reading material in particular yet, but this book is near the top of my queue based on its reviews.

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                  You could also add book tag.

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                    You should use the suggest feature!

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                    This is arguably one of the most influential books I’ve ever read in my entire life. I game a lot and read it very young; it’s shaped my world-view on a lot of things. Which is also amusing because it’s fairy contradictory to my actual politics; real life isn’t a game.

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                      I revisited this book when I started playing competitive Smash Bros. and it’s the gift that keeps on giving. The amount of focus on mental state in general is really useful.

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                        Without me potentially wasting time, as someone who rarely games at all, much less competitively, is there any reason for me to read this?

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                          The book is about high-level competitive play, but it’s also about the mindset it takes to prepare and get to world-class performance. Those parts might also be of value to you if you don’t mind having to cast from competition terms.