1. 42
  1. 5

    I didn’t know youtube had a RSS feed as well, cool!

    I think you’ll find many RSS users here at lobste.rs, it’s really handy (even though I subscribe using email and not RSS ;)

    1. 4

      They have 3 feed types that I’m aware of:

      You can usually get the appropriate slug from the url but It’s not always clear what the channel id is especially since youtube introduced urls like https://www.youtube.com/c/stanford for Stanford university. You need to scrape the page to find the channel id.

      I should add that their feeds are limited to the most recent additions so don’t expect to see a full history after you subscribe.

      1. 2

        RSS is the only way I can handle Youtube subscriptions. Being able to watch the video from my feed reader instead of the actual site, which is designed to get you to watch a ton of semi related videos, is the best.

      2. 5

        I’ve always had problems with RSS because I always found the list of “unread articles” stressful. I know you don’t need to read everything, but somehow my mind doesn’t cope well with the concept of “letting unread things remain unread” 🤷

        I find that Lobsters/HN/Reddit works fairly well.

        1. 2

          I’m in the same boat. When I used newsboat, a while ago, I had to mark everything as “read” weekly to keep out noise.

          I decided to make my own feed reader a few months ago. It ended up becoming a CLI that I pipe into fzf to read feeds. No read/unread, no complex navigation, and notifications on new items. It’s worked really well for me. If read/unread is overwhelming, you may consider it.

          1. 1

            list of “unread articles”

            That’s for the “main news” sites, where I also find RSS doesn’t work so well. But it works great for following low-traffic blogs from people where I want to see everything they post.

            1. 1

              Same, so I made my own that doesn’t have that.

            2. 4

              I wonder if RSS could get/would’ve gotten more traction if instead of calling it RSS we just called them “subscriptions”.

              1. 3

                Google did a too good job with GoogleReader, getting everybody to use it. Then they killed GoogleReader, because, hey, you don’t get promoted maintaining code, and that practically killed RSS.

                1. 5

                  Google Reader killed the RSS reader market, not RSS itself.

                  When it was discontinued, people were already moving off RSS. I distinctly remember someone saying RSS wasn’t needed, they got all their info via Twitter…

              2. 4

                RSS is the reason why I post a lot here! Makes it easy to find new posts.

                1. 2

                  I love RSS, but I had a problem where some things I wanted to follow didn’t have RSS feeds. So I built a feed aggregator that could create feeds out of any arbitrary Python code that returns a list of JSON objects, into which I could feed not only RSS feeds (via feedparser), but also subreddits (via praw) or even hashing the contents of a subsection of a Wikipedia page to monitor it for changes. It’s very convenient, and it runs on a Pi connected to my tinc VPN so I can access it from all my devices.

                  Definitely agree with the article that RSS or anything like it is superior to the sort of controlled lock-in that social media creates.

                  1. 1

                    “still use”? is there a better alternative?

                    1. 1

                      Personally I don’t care for RSS, because I like the diversity in presentation and styling that different sites use. I like seeing a grid of thumbnails on Youtube, or a list of threads with vote/comment counts on Reddit. I’m sure it’s possible to get similar presentation if you hack on your own RSS reader, but at that point I’d basically be rewriting those sites and I don’t see any benefit in it.

                      That said, some sites can get really annoying to browse, especially on mobile. I like RSS for those sites.

                      1. 4

                        I get this. And I agree when we’re talking about smaller sites+blogs.
                        I just use RSS to keep up-to-date with said sites/blogs, and I usually view the actual articles in a browser.

                        1. 2

                          A lot of formerly popular feed readers only showed title+link and you read on-site anyway, if that’s your thing

                          1. 1

                            A good example of it is are news sites, or ad-heavy sites. LitHub is one I like to read the articles but the actual site is littered with ads and related content blocks. Getting the articles from the RSS feed strips all that out and makes it much easier to read.

                          2. 1

                            This is great, I just switched my RSS reader feedly to NewsBlur.

                            I also choose NewsBlur because I couldn’t find a self-hosted project to accomplish what I needed, which was to select specific stories and then republish to a new RSS feed. So, I really recommend trying NewsBlur if you’re looking for a nice RSS aggregator.

                            1. 1

                              I consume all news sites via RSS in Claws Mail. It’s so much easier and faster to have one interface to skim all articles and only open those of interest, going directly to the site instead of via the news site. And the interface (of the RSS reader) stays the same even if the news site undergo revisions etc.

                              Sure, I miss out on comment threads that might be interesting from time to time. But if I think the comments might be interesting too I can easily open them. Like in this case.

                              1. 1

                                There’s https://frozen-lobster.rohanverma.net/ too which my friend has developed. It archives the top posts for the day.

                                Similar to https://www.daemonology.net/hn-daily/ which is for HN.