1. 10

Hello fellow crustaceans!

I was curious what type of keyboards we all use. Personally I split my time between a X201 ThinkPad and trusty Model M but I’m been eyeing a Das Keyboard… forever. Does anyone have a Das Keyboad 4 and if so, what do you think? Otherwise, what do you use?

  1.  

  2. 6

    Mostly the keyboard on a Lenovo X1 Carbon. Work has wired Apple keyboards.

    Typing too long on low-profile keyboards leaves my fingertips sore, so I have an Ergodox with Cherry MX brown switches. I don’t use it as much as I’d like because I trained it with the Norman layout. It was OK to only use qwerty on staggered keyboards and norman on columnar (qwerty at >110, norman >85), but then I tried norman on staggered - which was great, but wrecked me (under 20 wpm) for qwerty on staggered. I hadn’t realized how often I’d been using other people’s keyboards at home and work. I dropped norman entirely for a while to reacclimate to qwerty, then got busy with other things.

    So now I’m just irrationally annoyed every time I think about using the Ergodox and haven’t touched it in months. It feels like such a waste to have it on qwerty, but if I use it on norman I’m annoyed at every other keyboard using qwerty. It’s easier to avoid it than choose an annoyance to live with.

    1. 2

      I find Apple keyboards and the magic mouse really hard to get used to. For a while I was using an iMac with the USB keyboard, it was OK but I had soreness issues too. The Magic Mouse was hell for me, I grabbed a Apple TouchPad and it was much, much improved.

      1. 1

        Looking into getting a Logitech touchpad, how do you like your Apple TouchPad with a desktop?

        1. 2

          I used a touchpad for about a month. It’s pretty fun to use with big motions like switching windows and scrolling around, but I found it quite difficult to click on links. I also found myself getting wrist pains so I stopped using it.

          1. 1

            Thanks for the response. Wrist pain seems like a pretty valid concern, do you get wrist pain when using a trackpad on a laptop?

            1. 1

              I’m usually fine on my laptop.

    2. 5

      Home: Filco Majestouch Ninja 2 – quite a basic keyboard, just works

      Work: CoolerMaster Storm QuickFire Rapid – has backlight and other useless crap

      Spare: Leopold FC200RT/AB – most comfortable and convenient of all the mechanical keyboards I’ve bought, but mine often doubles key presses and I got it from overseas :(

      All of them are black, tenkeyless keyboards with MX Brown switches and ANSI layout. At least that’s what I ended up finding good to type on after some time of using and passionately hating anything rubberdomed I came in contact with (except for scissor switches, which are okayish). I’ve also tried Razer BlackWidow TE with Blue switches but that didn’t work out for me at all, disregarding the clicking. Even though it’s told to be a softer switch, it feels like exactly the other way around to me.

      1. 4

        Steelseries 6Gv2 - if it had a left Windows key, would be a great austere keyboard. A bit too loud for me though, so I may consider moving to a keyboard with a TrackPoint.

        I use a Trackman Wheel as my pointer device. I like thumbballs, but I am having some sticky button troubles.

        Occasionally, I use the keyboard on the X201, or the keyboard on my T42 or touch cover for Surface. Honourable mentions for the Steam controller and the screen of my Lumia 520.

        1. 4

          Oh! Fun topic. I strongly prefer split keyboards that can be placed far from each other; it helps my wrists, and it helps me feel relaxed when I’m at the machine.

          I use a Kinesis Freestyle 2 for Mac on my Linux desktop, because I used to use a Mac… the difference from “regular” is just that that one key has the command-key icon rather than the Windows icon, so I don’t feel like it justifies a replacement.

          As they get closer to sending their Kickstarter rewards, though, I’m getting more excited about “The Model 01: an heirloom-grade keyboard for serious typists”. The wood housing (seriously) looks like it’s going to be really pretty, and the individually addressable variable-color backlight LEDs seem like a neat source of things to write code for when bored and depressed, which is a frequent need for me.

          Depending on which label variations they end up going with, I may get the keys blank, or with draconic runes or something. I like the idea of being able to try to learn Dvorak or one of the other strange layouts, without having to feel like the physical labels are wrong. And I enjoy imagining the effect on anyone seeing it.

          It was a silly indulgence, but hey. Have to indulge in something.

          1. 2

            Dang, that’s a lovely keyboard, you’ll have to let us know how you like it.

            1. 1

              Will do!

          2. 4

            My time is split between three boards:

            Home: ErgoDox (Infinity) w/ Cherry MX browns

            Laptop: Lenovo X1 Carbon (1st gen)

            Work: KBC Poker 2

            My favorite is without a doubt the ergodox. Once I get a proper computer setup at work (aka school; ima grad student), I’ll probably swap the locations of the ergodox and the poker 2.

            1. 4

              Logitech K740. It’s a thin keyboard. I found it feels like a laptop keyboard, which makes it easier moving back and forth.

              1. 2

                I’ve flirted with some thin keyboards (also with thin crust pizza) but I’ve tended to gravitate towards deep-dish style keyboards

              2. 4

                I am typing on the keyboard of a Samsung ATIV Book 9, which is probably the best chiclet-style keyboard I’ve ever used on a laptop. The key travel is long enough to not bottom out and bounce (which hurts my fingers, as on the new MacBook), the tactile is chunky and requires decent force to activate, and the layout is sufficient. My only complaint is that there is a little squeaking if you move your fingers around without activating keys, and the Control and Fn keys are backwards of what my pinky knuckle is used to from years of Thinkpad and MacBook Air usage.

                I’ve tried a few mechanical keyboards but I just can’t get used to the long key travel and distance between the desktop and the keytop (which probably means I should be lifting my wrists when typing, but on a laptop this hasn’t been a problem).

                1. 3

                  I’m using a Lenovo KU-0225 atm, but at home it’s my Lenovo X1 Carbon keyboard (not the Gen. 2 version with the awful F-keys, Gen. 3 with the normal keys).

                  I also have a Logitech M705 wireless mouse.

                  1. 3

                    Kinesis Advantage. Switched from a Model M about 15 years ago and never looked back.

                    1. 1

                      I love the look of those but have never tried one, I usually have a cluttered desk so that kind of real estate would be tricky.

                      1. 1

                        I like the negative space, and the key layout. I have two, so if you happen to be in the GTA I’d be happy to lend one out for a test drive.

                        1. 1

                          Thanks! I’m all the way out on the prairies but if I find myself in TO I’ll give you a shout.

                    2. 3

                      I had a friend who tried the Das and hated it. I think for all keyboards, try before you buy is essentially mandatory if you’re dropping more than a token amount of cash.

                      Personally, I use exclusively old-style Thinkpad keyboards, both on my laptop (x301) and the old-style desktop keyboard Lenovo produced for a while on my desktop and at work. (Don’t buy that one, by the way. Amazon’s pricing goes off the rails on out-of-production products. If you want one, get it off eBay.)

                      My first personal (as opposed to shared-with-family) computer, and the one I did most of my high school coursework on, was a Thinkpad, and I got very used to the keyboard. Lately I’ve tried branching out and it turns out I’m infinitely frustrated by keyboards without a trackpoint. Even though I use an external mouse, I count on having the trackpoint and buttons available for little adjustments and clicks without removing my hands from the keyboard.

                      1. 2

                        Yeah, that’s definitely a fear; getting one and hating it. It usually takes me a couple days to adjust to a new keyboard anyways. TBH I’m pretty happy with the Model M, only drawbacks are PS/2 and no Windows key (I prefer that as my Mod key in i3). I have this hairbrained idea to use a Arduino Nano and a footpedal I found to emulate one… might be a reading week project.

                      2. 3

                        A Vortex Poker 3 Cherry MX Blue for home and a KBParadise V60 Matias Quiet Click for work

                        This pic is nice, but sadly the pictured keyboard is currently half desoldered. It will be reborn much more beautiful than before, though!

                        http://i.imgur.com/TXgWDRs.jpg

                        1. 2

                          For some reason that reminds me of those marshmallow peanut butter squares

                        2. 3

                          I’m using a TypeMatrix 2030 at work & at home, and have been for the past ~5 years or so. However, this won’t last long: I am switching to the Keyboardio Model 01 as soon as it ships, and plan to have an ErgoDox EZ by that time for work.

                          The TypeMatrix is lovely, the skinability is very useful, and the layout with Enter/Backspace/Del in the middle is incredibly convenient. I get frustrated very fast on the rare occassion when I have to use a traditional layout. Which is one of the reasons I am so very excited about the M01 and ErgoDox.

                          1. 3

                            For work or while travelling, I mostly use the ThinkPad X250 keyboard, which I find more or less acceptable. I’d prefer one a bit more like the older ThinkPads, with the longer throw and non-chiclet keys, but it does the job. I do find that my hands hurt a bit with this keyboard, which I think is partly due to the short throw but primarily due to the size of the layout: I have to move my wrists to reach all of the keys.

                            At home, and sometimes at work, I use the Happy Hacking Keyboard Professional 2, which I can’t help but feel is the only good keyboard, ever. The keys feel great, and the size is perfect, but what really puts it over the top, for me, is the layout. In particular, the placement of the Escape key (where the tilde/backtick is on standard, US QWERTY keyboards). As a vim user, it’s saved me a ton of wrist pain and everyday annoyance.

                            1. 2

                              Work: Microsoft Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000

                              Laptop: Standard Dell laptop keyboard.

                              1. 2

                                For membrane keyboard: Logitech Illuminated Keyboard K740

                                For main keyboard: Ducky Zero with Cherry Blacks.

                                For infuriating others: anything by Inland.

                                1. 2

                                  I bought a Wacom Intuos Pen and Touch Tablet some months ago to play around with. I quite like it for several reasons:

                                  • If you give me pens and paper I will lose the pens and roll my chair over the paper when it blows on the floor
                                  • When people want you to digitally sign PDFs (like on the websites where you draw in a box) your signature won’t look like it was written by a three year old
                                  • If you ever feel like actually working, as opposed to writing your name over and over, it’s good for taking quick notes, drawing diagrams, and writing proofs

                                  I believe you can get ones that aren’t touch sensitive, which I would recommend. The touch drivers are not so great, and I found I kept triggering random scrolls with the side of my hand while writing.

                                  1. [Comment from banned user removed]

                                    1. 4

                                      I feel like in a relaxed conversation kind of thread, upvotes can mean “thanks for sharing”. This isn’t a contest.

                                      I’m not sure what makes one keyboard more WASD than another, but I’m not understanding why you feel your contribution was uninteresting.

                                      1. [Comment from banned user removed]

                                        1. 4

                                          As interesting as it is to watch you trying to figure out the social rules here, I know that from a nice-person standpoint I should probably be trying to help instead of watching idly. I’m not sure that’s possible, but I’ll try.

                                          So, I wasn’t among the downvoters but I think “incorrect” is self-explanatory here? You described a theory about people’s motivations which they have direct knowledge of. I’m pretty sure most people don’t feel, most of the time, that the vote they chose to make was wrong - whatever “wrong” would even mean; it’s their vote to use how they want.

                                          Also, knowing the Lobsters community somewhat, I don’t think it’s likely that people are voting with whatever ulterior motive you’re imagining (I’m not actually sure what you’re suggesting). Discussion threads here are short enough that even the bottom post is still seen by most people. There’s no prize that unlocks for getting a million upvotes. It’s feedback to you, and it’s an expression of what people want the community to be. It’s not much more than that.

                                          I’m kind of expecting this will come off as condescending, and perhaps it is, but I can’t figure out what else to say. I won’t get into an argument about it; if you disagree with what I’m saying, I can’t stop you from ignoring it.

                                          1. [Comment from banned user removed]

                                            1. 3

                                              You’re entitled to these views; I’ve said all I know how to say about it. Thanks for reading and taking it seriously.