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    This looks pretty neat. Interesting that they chose node.js to write it in. I can see the sync with Onedrive and various other services being super useful for some people.

    I’ve used Notational Velocity a lot in the past. These days I just use Markdown and The Silver Searcher :)

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      Thanks, actually I’ve started with the Android app in React Native, and then I figured I could re-use most of this code to create a desktop client. There are some drawbacks working with JavaScript but it definitely makes it easier to write cross-platform code. Silver Searcher with markdown files seems like an interesting custom solution too!

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        I was pretty un-interested in this (after all, vim and grep is my text-based TODO management system), but when I kept reading and discovered you had a console-based app syncing with a mobile client, it really got my interest. Nice work! Frankly, I still see a lot of jank in the stack you’ve chosen, but I won’t bother with criticism. Its just an awesome app. :)

        However, I must now attest to wondering what better technology to accomplish a ncurses->objcMsgSend nirvana?

        Would you do another app with this, now you’ve done one?

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          Thanks, I realise it’s not the most popular stack though in this case it got the job done :)

          I’m not familiar with what ncurses->objcMsgSend is? Is that a macOS thing?

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            ncurses on the console (terminal), objcMsgSend on the iOS side of things. Its just a euphemism for what you’ve done .. albeit not a very accurate one. :)

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      Pity this doesn’t come with an emacs mode. It could leverage a lot of org-mode to do the actual note-side magic …

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        Have you tried deft? It is one of my favorite Emacs packages, and I use every opportunity I find to shill it.

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          I have, but I’ve not gotten a chance to dive very deeply into it. You’ve inspired me to take another look.

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          I’m curious, what emacs features would be useful in this app? It’s possible to change the text editor in which the notes are opened, so it can be set to emacs too, but I guess it’s not what you mean?

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            Org-mode has todo functionality, outlines/hierarchical lists &c. — you could use what it offers rather than having to reimplement for yourself. It’s basically a Markdown alternative with intelligence added.

            Writing Joplin as an application within emacs (leveraging org-mode) would also free you from a lot of the nitty-gritty details of dealing with terminals, redisplay, panes/windows, writing a command mode &c. It’s pretty cool (and the reason that I’m more than a bit of an emacs fanatic). Basically, you could stand on the shoulders of others, which is always awesome.

            Certainly, what you’ve already built is pretty cool. One advantage of writing it in JavaScript — as you have — is that you can easily share the backend between your mobile app and your CLI program. There’s no good story for doing that with elisp right now (or, probably, ever).

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              On the other hand, you have to embrace Emacs; and for many, that’s a hard sell. Elisp hasn’t been very good performance wise for years, the UI can be problematic even if it’s completely reconfigurable, and Emacs is basically a silo, as you’ve implied. I myself have tried to make peace with Emacs, but it never clicks for me.

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                Technically you don’t have to write too much elisp. Emacs now supports shared module libraries. I’ve written emacs stuff in go.

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