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    This is a gem, described originally as “The translator pretends to be a Solaris audio device and acts as a rump kernel client converting I/O to the NetBSD audio device.”

    This is one twisted, yet clever hack.

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      I’m unclear where the sound goes. Can I output sound from my Linux desktop to play on the hurd machine? Or can I play music on the hurd machine to come out the speakers on the Linux machine?

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        As I understand it, a single machine is set up as follows:

        • GNU Hurd is installed as the OS.
        • The linked project is installed into GNU Hurd as a virtual audio device. It provides partial emulation of a Solaris audio device and outputs audio through GNU Hurd’s audio subsystem, which uses drivers from the NetBSD project.
        • PulseAudio is installed as a daemon running on top of GNU Hurd. It is built with support for Solaris audio devices and configured to output through the virtual one this project provides.
        • Software implemented against the PulseAudio API can thus run on this GNU Hurd installation, streaming audio to the PulseAudio server daemon, which in turn streams it to the virtual Solaris audio device, which in turn streams it to GNU Hurd’s audio subsystem, which in turn streams it to a real audio output device—all on the same machine.

        I believe PulseAudio includes support for streaming audio over the network from PulseAudio client applications to a PulseAudio server. Thus, in addition to the typical single-machine use case, you could also use this project to stream audio from applications running on a Linux machine to PulseAudio server running on a GNU Hurd system. You could also stream audio from applications running on a GNU Hurd machine to a PulseAudio server running on a Linux system, but the linked project isn’t necessary in that scenario.

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          that sounds complicated, though I think not more than existing systems are in practice. There’s always one more layer.

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            It’s very much a hack.