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    This post is really great, I wish I had those when I began working remotely. It applies to remote jobs, coronavirus or not.

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      I would also recommend people that aren’t used to remote, to install a browser extension or else to restrict the time on some websites. Being alone at home (the place where you usually give yourself a good rest) is a more tempting place and time to spend more time than usual on websites such as youtube or lobsters.

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        I’ve been searching for such things for Linux for quite a while. Is there anything you recommend?

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          I use Ubuntu on my laptop, and I have a multi-layered approach: /etc/hosts to block out a number of websites, and a RescueTime subscription to redirect sites if I happen to unblock something locally (because I have sudo access).

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        Start your day with a bike ride. Take your dog for a walk. Go to the bakery and get a coffee for breakfast

        Ahem… that’s exactly what you’re not supposed to do. Everybody has been daying literally just one thing: stay at home and don’t get out unless you have to (for example: grocery store). Exceptions can be made for those whose job hasn’t been suspended and cannot be performed from home.

        I know it’s dreadful. However… This is the situation, there’s no going around it.

        Right now we all must just suck it up until this issue is solved.

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          working from home doesn’t mean you can’t get out of the house at all, just avoid social contacts. Bike rides or dog walking should be totally safe?

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            working from home doesn’t mean you can’t get out of the house at all, just avoid social contacts. Bike rides or dog walking should be totally safe?

            working from home doesn’t mean you can’t get out of home at all.

            working from home during a coronavirus pandemic does mean you shouldn’t get out of home at all.

            The thing is, if everybody goes “the bakery and get coffee for breakfast” then we’re back at the starting point. Don’t focus on the potentially safe part. The author is specifically advising people to get out and go into a closed, public space. I can’t understand why you’re ignoring that part of the advise.

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              You’re both right. The bakery part of the advice was probably a bad idea, but the bike-riding and dog-walking part was probably fine. I don’t think there’s any evidence, is there, that the virus can hang suspended in the air even once an infected person has left? It seems that if you stay a meter away from anyone else (and wash your hands when you get home) then you’re not going to get the virus simply from going outside.

              (If this is wrong then I would love to know that, though!)

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                From what I gather, the virus can spread through air alone, but taking a walk without breathing in any air that other humans nearby exhale should be fine.

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                  The most recent data I’ve seen still supports that it’s sufficiently heavy to fall to the ground outside a meter. That’s why the quarantine distances are generally 2m or more.

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                    My understanding was that it mostly traveled in water droplets.

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                  (Replying to myself because it’s too late to edit.)

                  Here is a preprint of an article whose abstract says, “We found that viable virus could be detected in aerosols up to 3 hours post aerosolization.” It seems like the researchers only measured for three hours, so it’s not like the virus was gone at that point, although they observed that the concentration decreased exponentially during that time. This study has not been peer reviewed and I am not a doctor; I don’t know what implications this has for real-world transmission of the disease.

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                    I don’t think there’s any evidence, is there, that the virus can hang suspended in the air even once an infected person has left?

                    I don’t think there is, but I’m kind of curious what it’s like if you rode in a peloton. I was looking at some research on protective equipment someone had shared on reddit related to the regular social distancing recommendations, and it was interesting to see just how far we can spray germs.

                    More seriously, I think running or riding on your own is fine as long as you don’t get yourself into an incident that requires medical care. I normally start riding outside in April, but the Philadelphia weather is mild enough already. I’m probably going to stick to jogging, or easy cycling just in case I have some stupid bike accident. I’m generally cautious, but the road cycling group I ride with push it (great for fitness!), but a year never passes without a few run-ins for others in the group.

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                      That’s a good point. This is a terrible time to take unnecessary risks: if you hurt yourself, you face the dual possibilities that you won’t be able to get medical treatment (because the facilities are full of people with covid-19) or that you will be able to get medical treatment but that you’ll be preventing someone else from being treated for the virus. For myself, I’m planning on staying inside except as demanded by my dog.

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                    I agree, going to a coffee shop might not be the best advice. I was reacting to the idea you should literally not get outside the house at all, which I find ludicrous (and bad for mental health, too — not sustainable).

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                      That is literally what happens in Italy atm and it will probably hit more countries very soon

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                    Depends. If you’re staying home because you feel contagious it’s best to keep at it.

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                    This straight up isn’t helpful advice.

                    We can practice social distancing without quarrantining ourselves. Going to take a bike ride, walk your dog, or get a coffee (short of the risk you take interacting with the barrista!) doesn’t increase anyone’s risk of infection.

                    People have to maintain their mental health too, you know. That’s what this part of the article is about.

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                      or get a coffee (short of the risk you take interacting with the barrista!)

                      The risk you take interacting the barrista and everyone else in the cafe!

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                        The cafes around here are no longer full. Most people are getting drinks and leaving. They aren’t making a tightly packed queue. Those staying inside are 2-3m from each other.

                        Does this seem reasonable, based on the advice going around? I’m not sure but if it’s enough to keep people safe and also allow businesses and some normal to continue operating.

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                          That’s totally reasonable. Also, there’s a high chance that infection will happen at some point, the question is when. Social distancing is a delay technique not a contingency technique.

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                            That’s exactly where I’m at.

                            There are no lines. There is at most one other person waiting, and they stand a distance away. The barrista is wearing gloves and a face mask.

                            We all need to be reasonable here, for whatever values of reasonable make sense to you.

                            Obv if you’re high risk you need to simply stay home and if you go out at all be HIGHLY risk averse.

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                      I’ve been disconnecting my desktop’s peripherals and moving the desk every morning, and hooking up the work laptop to them. It feels like a good amount of separation, and I can’t switch back quickly for a few minutes.

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                        Great post! Virus outbreak is not an ideal way to start a remote work experience as a thoughtful implementation and time to get used to it are lacking. Still I do hope that at least some find it useful and perhaps stick to it after the normal service resumes. There are many benefits on personal and societal levels.