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    When I think of hypervisors, I think of running an ubuntu or centos image under the hypervisor. I think that this article points out something interesting: there’s another class of software, unikernels, that runs under a hypervisor. I believe that containers have beaten the VMs of yesterday–whole system images. On the flip side, I am not aware of any unikernels that have taken off or even been seriously considered for large production deployments–I’ve only seen POCs.

    I think that this is the fundamental point: containers share the kernel, thus inheriting isolation/security flaws and wonderful amounts of plumbing (e.g. filesystems, network APIs, etc). Unikernels share the hypervisor kernel, thus inheriting the security/isolation (which is better) but missing out on some of the higher-level plumbing. Ultimately, these systems seem to be converging on the same middle ground from two different sides: the userspace and the kernelspace.

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      On the flip side, I am not aware of any unikernels that have taken off or even been seriously considered for large production deployments–I’ve only seen POCs.

      Pretty sure Galois' HaLVM has seen actual use. There are also some JeOS (just enough OS) flavors from a few distributions/OSes.

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        That’s really exciting! Any idea what industries have been using it, or at what scale?

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          I ran across this and this a few months ago. No firsthand knowledge.