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web archive as the site has stability issues (at least for me)

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    I think people are really blowing the whole TempleOS thing out of proportion either to troll Terry (which is sad really) or because they are really really naive about programming outside their little bubble. The reddit thread exploded where people are just goading Terry or pretending like he’s the second coming when he says stuff like TempleOS will never have things like mmap because he refuses to follow Linux/Unix, and TempleOS will always make you read/write the whole file through a compression filter.

    It’s a cool project and it’s interesting that people are playing with it, but I think a huge portion of the social popularity of posts like this especially on reddit where he isn’t banned has to do with exploiting a man’s condition for entertainment which is sickening.

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      I can tell you why I linked it & why I read most articles about the system.

      This is as pure as hobbies can go. It’s not done for fame (at least not apparently), without a goal to be useful to anyone except the author. It’s a breath of fresh air and really interesting for someone not writing an operating system since the mid 90s. His OS may be old school but it also allows a new generation of people (or people that didn’t go into OS development) to look how things were done or how they could have been done.

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        Oh definitely. I keep up with info about it (to know that Terry even updated his site recently) and it’s a pretty huge body of work, and I’ve churned my way through most of his videos, but in general I think there are more people on the other side of the coin that treat him like a side show attraction.

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          I’ve spent a lot of time working on software with a lot of practical constraints including customer and user requirements, legacy API compatibility, large amounts of legacy code, and short delivery schedules. For contrast it’s interesting to read about systems with totally foreign requirements, I don’t really understand what Terry is doing with TempleOS but the purity of it makes it pretty fascinating and a nice intermission between work and work.

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          Agreed, although I think that some people are not aware of his mental condition. Check out this comment.

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            I’d be surprised if that were the case. Every time TempleOS gets mentioned anywhere there’s a huge disclaimer about Terry and his psyche. I mean the story about After Egypt and that he believes that generating a random number and corresponding it to a word in the King James Bible is in essence communicating with God is a staple in TempleOS mythos.

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            because they are really really naive about programming outside their little bubble

            How’s so?

            The ultimate programmer’s hobby project (well, from a technical point of view) it’s certainly to build an operating system from scratch. If you have posix support you have loads of applications to snatch into it. Terry ignores posix, so he has to implement the “user space” too.

            It has some features that date way back to the 70/80’s, that are non-existent in current day operating systems.

            And you can’t deny that this is a technically demanding task, so probably because of that that he was godded on reddit. Most of us, in perfect mental shape, would be unable to accomplish this. I know I wouldn’t.

            If showing admiration for a great hobby project is naivety … I don’t know.

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              If showing admiration for a great hobby project is naivety … I don’t know.

              It’s not admiration it’s more like buying into thought leadership from it, because these people have never done or learned systems programming properly in college.

              Example on Reddit there’s a thread that Praises Terry for going against the grain and not following Unix/Linux, and what did Terry not follow? Oh nothing he just refuses to implement real buffers, or mmap and requires that all files in TempleOS are read/written in their entirety through a compression filter.

              When I pointed out how infeasible it is to run a good portion of modern software (video players, audio players, databases) on a system that does this, I was met with “oh man but our RAM is so big”.

              It has some features that date way back to the 70/80’s, that are non-existent in current day operating systems.

              Only some of them are not. Many of the ones that people rave about are in Plan9/Plan9FromUserspace. Again people don’t really have domain knowledge and it becomes “everything old is new”.

              And you can’t deny that this is a technically demanding task, so probably because of that that he was godded on reddit. Most of us, in perfect mental shape, would be unable to accomplish this. I know I wouldn’t.

              Of course, but that doesn’t mean that things that Terry does differently are implicitly “good” and without problems/complications. I mean the whole thing is in ring0 and he markets it as a feature. I mean you really have people who have never written a lick of low level code commenting about how “awesome” it is. I mean 30 years ago TempleOS could have realistically been an undergrad project. It’s an impressive project and it’s unique, but it’s not well designed, and you have people comparing him to Theo De Raadt and the OpenBSD team because he “refuses to compromise” which is hilarious because he refuses to get out of ring0 and implement buffered/mapped read/writes.

              I’m fine with admiration of effort but lets be realistic about his design choices.