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    This was floating around the web a couple months ago, I think.

    To be blunt, this implementation doesn’t excite me. It’s basically a microcontroller hooked up to an e-ink screen. Loads of potentially cool applications I’m sure but it’s going to take a ton of work to get it anywhere near the rough feature set of the very first Kindle. And e-ink displays have come down in price enough that buying one from china and wiring it up to just about any Arduino is both trivial and affordable.

    A “real’ open Kindle alternative would be capable of running a Linux distro, perhaps even Android, in order to leverage all of the existing drivers and software for connectivity and handling of media. Something like a Raspberry Pi would be just about ideal, if the Pi had any capability whatsoever for power management or sleep modes.

    That said, I certainly do appreciate the work that went into this (the PCB is a work of art, you must check it out) and I can see this being an important stepping stone in some EE or embedded developer’s educational path.

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      A “real’ open Kindle alternative would be capable of running a Linux distro, perhaps even Android, in order to leverage all of the existing drivers and software for connectivity and handling of media.

      there are loads of android e-ink tablets. they all suck and are massively painful to use.

      It kinda depends on your use case, but if you actually are looking for a “digital book”, trying to get a full-fledged Android OS running on it is pretty counter productive.

      I could definitely see the value of running a super stripped down Linux. I believe that the Kindle is basically this. Though for me my Kindle is great partly because it has nice fonts and things like that. Not super interested in what’s going on in this picture.

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        IIRC, the first Kindle was an e-ink screen, wifi chip and net stack, flash storage, and enough compute to run Linux + X + an ebook viewer.

        At 520 KiB SRAM, an ESP32 is too small to run the web browser that ePUBs and MOBIs are now. But … we’re getting closer.

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        Here’s another take on this idea: https://www.crowdsupply.com/e-radionica/inkplate-6

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          I appreciate the effort put into this project, but the article seems a little dramatic. Kindle/Kobo/Nook all support DRM-free formats. You may need to use Calibre to convert between formats, but there’s no requirement to use DRMed books. For example, all of the ebooks on Gutenberg are DRM-free.

          But I agree that Amazon’s DRM is bad for the reader.

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            As soon as you want to read something recent, you have a need for DRMed books, don’t you, or am I missing something?

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              De-DRM’ing most ebooks is trivial.

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                It depends. Kobo has DRM-free books (but it’s not 100% of their library IIRC). Games Workshop’s books are all DRM-free. I think O’Reilly books are DRM-free (at least, the last book I bought from them was). Many independently-published books are also restriction-free.

                That said, amazon probably does have them beat on sheer volume of available books.

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              Kindles are popular, but they lock you into Amazon’s ecosystem

              No they don’t.

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                I think that the hardware is only half the battle, how easy is it to get new books in non-DRM formats?

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                  Getting DRM free books can be challenging, but not impossible. Some publishers listed here https://www.libreture.com/bookshops/

                  It’s also worth noting that it’s possible to strip DRM from books you buy using tools like Calibre.

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                    Black Library ebooks are (AFAIK) DRM-free.