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    Github Codespaces vcs github.com
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    In the docs there’s this nugget:

    Codespaces allows you to develop in the cloud instead of locally. Developers can contribute from anywhere, on any machine, including tablets or Chromebooks, and there is no need to maintain local copies of intellectual property.

    isn’t it scary how corporate programmers won’t even be trusted with source code locally? Big companies are going to expect their engineers to write features, while keeping them at arm’s length. I’m not particularly excited about moving IDEs to the cloud…

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      I think this is not referring to deliberate exfiltration but accidental, like a laptop being stolen/seized at a border control etc. e.g. Google security policy absolutely forbids checking out code to a laptop. When you work remotely you either use SSH or a Remote Desktop.

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        I don’t think it’s necessarily about that; managing dev environments across different platforms (Linux, macOS, Windows) for dozens or more developers can be a pain. A lot of devs are just devs and not sysadmins, so they’re not very good at fixing issues, and rolling out backwards-incompatible changes is hard.

        A “cloud dev environment” like this could potentially save a lot of problems there, while it would also introduce some problems. It would not be my favourite solution, but I do think it’s about more than just “trusting devs with source code locally”.

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          Source exfiltration concerns aren’t the only reason (though it does tend to make security folks happy) to keep code off laptops. Another reason is when you have a GIANT source tree, moving the entire setup to a cloud system means that a cloud-hosted build setup has more immediate/transparent access to things, and some IDE-like features become doable again whereas previously you would have just watched some language indexer grind away for hours to no avail.

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            Thank you, that makes sense for big companies with giant monorepos, I imagine, indeed. Sharing the indexer cache is a nice feature.

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            Deliberately not keeping source code on a developer’s physical computer is genuinely useful for mitigating attacks on confidential information caused by theft of the computer and simultaneously genuinely useful for preventing a developer from doing things with their firm’s source code the firm doesn’t want them to do. There’s no way to technologically distinguish a thief with a stolen laptop from a disgruntled employee stealing their employer’s source code from an employee making a local copy of the code for some legitimate development purpose.

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            It only works in Google Chrome and Microsoft Chrome, unfortunately:

            For the best experience with Codespaces, we recommend using a Chromium-based browser, like Google Chrome or Microsoft Edge. Firefox is currently unsupported, and there are known issues using Safari.

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              Codespaces allows you to develop in the cloud instead of locally. Developers can contribute from anywhere, on any machine, including tablets or Chromebooks

              …and on iOS all browsers including Chrome use the Safari rendering engine so this doesn’t really open up development on the most popular tablet platform at all.

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                I imagine they will add that.

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                Before that note is this paragraph, though:

                During the beta, functionality is limited.

                So hopefully once it’s actually released it will be usable in every browser.

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                  It only works in Google Chrome and Microsoft Chrome, unfortunately:

                  To be honest, it’s quite scary to run all of that inside a browser. Can you imagine the performance on that?

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                    It probably performs fine on most development machines, to be fair.

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                  Seems ok at first, but don’t be surprised when people can no longer use or contribute to your project without asking microsoft for permission.

                  Also remember large tech companies have reputations for banning accounts with little room for appeal.

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                    Very exciting stuff. There are a bunch of projects I’ve tried to contribute to, usually where I know the language but am not fluent in the devenv, package manager, build tool, etc. Getting all that running locally for a one-time contribution is a lot of overhead.

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                      It is funny how we went from:

                      • mainframes + terminals

                      to

                      • personal computers

                      to

                      • personal computers + internet

                      and are finally getting to

                      • cloud™ + terminals

                      I’m not sure I like it…

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                        Kinda funny that this is what a lot of people always thought Atom was ultimately intended for, but now that they’ve finally done it they’re using VS Code (for obvious reasons). I wonder what, if anything, this means for the future of Atom.

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                          This means that we finally got an official GitHub VSCode theme!

                          Am I the only one obsessed with the GitHub theme and color schemes in general?

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                            The GitHub theme is superb. I used a variant of it with MacVim for a long time.

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                            I think this looks great.

                            Someone on the orange site (which I really don’t know why I keep going to, habit I guess) was upset saying “they’re spread too thin”, which seems entirely wrong. It just means that Microsoft is investing heavily. That is only good. Heck, I’d consider a job if they’d set up an office in Santa Cruz :)

                            But I do wish that they’d invest in GitHub Issues and code review. I don’t think anyone can say with a straight face that they like them. There has to be a better way, perhaps a V2 that runs alongside using the same database but allowing a V1 UI for the people that can’t let it go. Gerrit has a better code review system, I don’t know about GitLab. There are certainly examples that can be cribbed from.

                            EDIT: I’d also like to see them expand the remit of their CLI project to try and rethink the Git terminal workflow. Again, as above, I don’t think many people like it. It’s grown organically and a new way of interacting with Git knowing what we know now could be huge.

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                              I really like GitHub Issues. My company forced my team to switch to Jira a few months ago, and it’s miserable. I can’t believe that in 2020 there are still major commercial web-apps as shitty as Jira. They can’t even get their textareas to work right; half the time when I hit Submit I watch it mangle my markup.

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                                I’ve used GitHub Issues for over 10 years and like it. Of the 10 or so issue tracking tools I’ve used, it’s my favorite.

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                                  Heck, I’d consider a job if they’d set up an office in Santa Cruz :)

                                  Besides the unusual circumstances of everyone working from home, GitHub is very remote-friendly. You should apply! (If you meant Microsoft, I can’t help there…)

                                  All I can say about the other things is stay tuned. These were some impactful releases today, but we’re not done yet.

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                                    I also like Github issues. I’ve used issue trackers for something like 18 years, literally every day at points, and I can’t think of one that’s clearly better than Github. I’ve been using it regularly for at least 4 years.

                                    Like all software, it can be improved more (e.g. latency), but I can find about 100 other pieces of software to complain about first.

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                                    I see the appeal of this, but I am not sure how I feel about moving even more stuff into the browser. I tried webmail and moved back to Thunderbird. I tried Overleaf/ShareLaTeX and moved back to TeXStudio. I guess I just like locally installed software.

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                                      General-purpose computing slipped away from consumers, now it’s starting to slip away from developers. Be careful what you wish for…

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                                        It didn’t slip away so much as it was stolen. Mostly by software developers.

                                        I suppose in some sense we have this coming.

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                                          Unfortunately, you’re correct. The alarm was sounded years ago https://boingboing.net/2012/01/10/lockdown.html and we sleepwalked straight into it.

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                                        What a crazy business move. Well done Microsoft. Goodbye freedom.

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                                          What freedom is being lost?

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                                            Well, some people live in countries under sanctions for one, or are banned from having microsoft accounts.

                                            Once projects start to depend on these environments, this will almost certainly increase the barrier to entry for people who don’t want to, or cannot use them.

                                            Straight out of the microsoft play book will be to add proprietary extensions to these code envs and encourage projects to rely on them.

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                                              Thanks for expanding.

                                              Well, some people live in countries under sanctions for one,

                                              The international sanctions regime is arguably broken and/or evil, but GH/MSFT are bound to follow US law, as that’s the jurisdiction in which they are incorporated. The correct way to fix sanctions is through political action, not for software companies to change their product launches.

                                              or are banned from having microsoft accounts.

                                              Again, while GH/MSFT would love to have more customers or users, they can’t force organizations to support them.

                                              Once projects start to depend on these environments, this will almost certainly increase the barrier to entry for people who don’t want to, or cannot use them.

                                              Like many people online, you seem to confuse the right of free expression with the ability to monetize that expression. The real violation of human rights is not that a citizen of North Korea cannot compete in the global software marketplace, but that the regime of North Korea is denying its citizens of the human right of free expression.

                                              Straight out of the microsoft play book will be to add proprietary extensions to these code envs and encourage projects to rely on them.

                                              This is just normal competition in the free market. This behavior is what Google and Facebook do too, in their respective properties. Again, it’s arguably bad in a broad societal sense, but the solution is probably political action or enforcement of existing legislation, not voluntary restrictions from the companies themselves - something that is against their fiduciary duty as corporations.

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                                                I think its smart by microsoft. I just think its not smart for people to use it without understanding the trade offs.

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                                                  I agree with that. Thankfully, the debate about what “free” services actually cost is ongoing and more widespread.

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                                          Having used something like this in a previous life, I’m very excited to see a publicly available web-based VCS-backed IDE come to life. Congrats to the team!

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                                            Maybe offtop. I was thinking how sourcehut functionality compares to specifically codepsaces. I think it is actually pretty close. It has git push -O ci origin branch. It is also possible to ssh to the build machine. Next step is to not shut it down and allow dev right in the CI machine.

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                                              This appears to be an advertising publication for Github. I have flagged it spam.

                                              While obviously new Github features would be of interest to many readers here, in a recent similar post on Lobsters it was mentioned that anybody who really wants to know about these is almost certainly receiving their email publications.

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                                                Look at the discussion it’s spawned though: much of it is primarily about what the impact of the product launch will be, freedom, etc. You can’t get that from a GitHub email.

                                                I missed the post you’re referring to, would you mind linking it?