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    For prior versions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and most Linux distributions, users have been locked to the system version of Python unless they got away from the system’s package manager.

    Eh? All systems I know of allow installing both Python 2 and 3, and have for a very long time. No one is “locked” to anything.

    I guess this is “new” for RHEL based on “we can now make multiple versions of Python available and easily installable, from the standard repositories, into the standard locations”. I’m pretty sure I’ve installed Python 3 on CentOS machines in the past, though I think that must have been using one of community repos instead of the standard ones.

    I also find it interesting that the “new” RHEL 8 uses Python 3.6 from 2016, instead of 3.7 from 2018.

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      For prior versions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and most Linux distributions, users have been locked to the system version of Python unless they got away from the system’s package manager.

      Eh? All systems I know of allow installing both Python 2 and 3, and have for a very long time. No one is “locked” to anything.

      What they mean by the above is: for the duration of most OSes’ life cycle, /usr/bin/python existed and was version 2.7, or 3.6, etc., and that’s that - you could not change the system’s default Python version.

      What RedHat has done isn’t anything new - OpenBSD has been doing exactly that - there is no default /usr/local/bin/python.

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        I also find it interesting that the “new” RHEL 8 uses Python 3.6 from 2016, instead of 3.7 from 2018.

        As to that, Python 3.7 has been released on 27th of June 2018, while RHEL 8 is based on Fedora 28, which itself has been released on the 1st of May 2018.

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      I think this is a solid move from Red Hat. The only thing that IMO could be a “cleaner” move would be to drop Python 2 entirely (to the extent that it is possible) and make Python 3 the default, like Arch Linux is currently in the process of doing.

      End of life for Python 2 is 2020-01-01.

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        Remember, this is Enterprise Linux - many companies rely on the very long life cycle and support for their still-current-but-soon-to-become-legacy codebase. With RHEL 8, they’ve got 5, 10, or 12 years to migrate! ;^)

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          Holy legacy batman.