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    Yet another Electron app :(

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      What’s wrong with using Electron?

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        A lot of overhead compared to a native application.

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          I imagine it’s a nightmare to port. I haven’t seen a single electron app ported to OpenBSD. Additionally like mentioned by others - the overhead (resources) and complexity of the whole platform (security) that is not required for most apps.

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            Is Chromium available on OpenBSD? I assume Node.js is.

            This feels like a good Google Summer of Code project for Electron. Getting on more platforms is probably more of a question of removing platform-specific ops code more than anything else.

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              Is Chromium available on OpenBSD? I assume Node.js is.

              Yes we have both Chromium & Node.js.

              This feels like a good Google Summer of Code project for Electron. Getting on more platforms is probably more of a question of removing platform-specific ops code more than anything else.

              This might be much harder than you make it sound. Take a look at the amount of Chromium patches we maintain ourself as upstream isn’t happy about BSD support.

              I’m sure the code is portable but the task is not small.

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                It is, but it takes hours to compile. If 36 copies of chrome show up in the form of electron, that can substantially delay new sets. I also have my filesystem partitioned to a certain size. There’s a limit to how many apps like this I can install.

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                  Personally hoping someone makes an “Electron Runtime”, like how the JVM works (or Python, or Ruby…), and we could just distribute the web file….

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                    Ditto, I think the problem with that is that Chrome (and to a slightly lesser extent node.js) are such rapidly moving targets that having a single “Electron VM” for multiple apps may be tricky, at least at the moment.

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              I’ve seen it break some of the accessibility tools (screen readers mostly) in strange ways.

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                I don’t know what this says about Electron itself, but the two Electron-created apps I’ve used most, Slack and Atom, are, IMHO, not great. They’re sluggish, eat memory and have a sizeable disk footprint.

                I can see the thinking behind creating desktop apps using web technologies, but is Chrome really the best engine to use (yes, I know Electron uses node.js which needs v8) and do we really need a full-fat browser to run a web-based desktop application? Chrome is a slow resource hog as a web browser, so why would I want to be running local apps that use it? But maybe that’s just me being a grump.

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              Wow, that’s pretty native looking for an Electron app… is that Mac OS UI chrome on Windows?

              One thing I am displeased about is that Electron might be slowly crippling the Mac’s native app ecosystem, which has historically been strong and focused on good polish. (Windows' native app ecosystem is in a coma, despite being the dominant desktop OS.) Now you have sloppy web devs who think they’re native cross-platform (if they just don’t target Mac OS only) devs, and it’s terrible.

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                A (non-free) alternative I’ve been using quite happily for a while now is Deckset. Same kind of idea, write your presentation using Markdown with some idiosyncrasies and then Deckset can apply a number of themes. Works well.

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                  Woah, thanks for that. Great find.

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                  The concept of markdown as a presentation format is limited to a really small code oriented population. On the other hand, markdown as a documentation format has wide applications.

                  I.e. Apple Keynote slides vs presentation on teaching engineers a how to use a new tool