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    “Digitize books” was something I could get behind. “Train our self-driving cars”? Not so much. Bit of a trojan horse, innit? I prefer to solve the audio captchas, but am occasionally rebuked. Perhaps the scammers will eventually figure out how to automatically solve it. What’ll come next? “Select the members of al qaeda”? The format’s ripe for memeing on.

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        Select all squares that match “Sarah Connor”.

        https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DJeAlYTVAAAk7Lp.jpg

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        I usually have better luck if I log into my Gmail before trying. And no, I am not happy about that. Also check this out:

        https://recaptcha-demo.appspot.com/recaptcha-v3-request-scores.php

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          Hey, AJ — I got a chuckle out of this.

          How about posting a screenshot?

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            Thanks! I’m glad to hear it. I added a screenshot to the blog post, and also added some details I forgot to include originally - especially a link to the source.

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            as far as I heard they don’t actually use the results as it’s too noisy (heard ~2 years ago)

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              It’s interesting to me that people oppose doing “dirty work for free”, when they have no objections from using Google Maps or Google Street View without paying anything.

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                It was a bait and switch.

                When I started using Google services, the company motto was “don’t be evil”. We were told that advertising paid the bills, yes… but, their ads were refreshing compared to the competition.

                Back then, the start page was something like 2.6kb of hand-tuned HTML. All the ads were text only and they lived in their own little box.

                When Maps first came out (or whatever it was called back then), it was amazing compared to MapQuest. It was marketed as free to consumers.

                FFS, nobody ever questioned my very humanity on the internet back then. There were guides about how to be a polite netizen while running scripts and bots… Google themselves argued that their bot traffic was generally no more of a burden than a single user checking out the entire site once every couple of weeks…

                I get that things have changed. But your suggestion that we should be happy to train robots in exchange for use of these services is disconnected from the history of our use of these services–we already had an exchange in place and it wasn’t this one.