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    Ive been in conversations online in various places about getting Firefox revenue off ad revenue. One of my ideas was enterprise features licensed at a nice price. Like wigh Open Core, makknv the enterprise features paid has almost no effect on individuals that make up their majority of users.

    “a little something extra for everyone who deploys Firefox in an enterprise environment. …”

    Then, they start adding that stuff in for free. So much for that idea.

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      They could start with a Windows Server GPO that was easy to install and configure. There’s no bigger Firefox advocate than me, yet I’m forced to use Chrome on my network because it was so easy to configure high-security policies for it, whereas I gave up trying to do the same for Firefox.

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        Bookmarking that idea in case I ever get a chance to talk to their managemeng about this stuff. :)

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          Thanks Nick! I’m no manager but I can take it from here (on Monday, because I’m off for the rest of the week):-))

          @jrc: Are you willing to expand on that hardship? AFAIU our project managers have worked with some enterprises to hear about their needs. This is in part because the enterprise mailing list we have doesn’t contain enough vocal enterprises willing to talk about their pain points in the open.

          Did you try the GPO features we just released with Firefox 60? What were you trying to do that didn’t work? Is there anything else you were missing?

          For everyone else reading this, please answer those questions as well and I’m happy to forward the whole thread.

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            I’m not jrc, and this isn’t specifically related but my biggest problem with Firefox largely boils down to the fact that it’s not portable. It’s one of the few things where I get a new computer, plug in my drive, and it isn’t already working. I just did it again today, and while I use sync, losing my open tabs (on the session I’m using), cookies, extension data, and everything else that goes along with my previous session isn’t great.

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              Sorry to pile onto that, but on a slightly related note: It’s embarrassing that Firefox is still dumping folders into $HOME instead of following the applicable standard.

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                Update! Please read through the policy templates repo and file issues there.

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                  No fix for this and I don’t think that’s the appropriate place for it. :-/

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              Hi! Sorry I didn’t see your reply or I would have commented back sooner. To answer your question, it’s been a couple years since I tried it. However, I’m about to upgrade to Windows Server 2016, so I will give it another go with Firefox and document the experience.

              I can say off the top of my head, on my particular network, I’m looking to:

              Browse websites and do nothing else. Easily lock out the ability to print, change any configuration settings at all, including visibility of toolbars, Firefox sync, managing search engines, anything like that.

              I’d also like to be able to easily (1) install and (2) configure settings for add-ons, to manage mass deployment of updates to those add-ons, etc.

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                Thanks for the feedback. Great to hear you’ll give it a try. I suppose that not exactly 100% of your requirements will be satisfied, but I’d love to see a blog post about your endeavors (unless it’s shattering criticism ;))

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                Update! Please read through the policy templates repo and file issues there.

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          Finally, ES Modules enabled by default in a production release!

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            Overview of ES Modules for the uninitiated: https://hacks.mozilla.org/2018/03/es-modules-a-cartoon-deep-dive/