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    On the technical side…

    Even the most accurate systems fail 5 percent to 10 percent of the time

    What does that mean? It looks in the database and finds the wrong result? Or it compares my face to my record in the database and indicates they’re different? Something else? Is this failure rate relevant to whatever purpose these scans are for?

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      Most facial recognition algorithms I’m aware of rank a new image by closeness to existing ones, so I’d assume failures mean getting a different record.

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        Right, so that’s often the case. But the article also says this is replacing a procedure that’s currently done by hand. I’m pretty sure the human passport scanners aren’t comparing against a database of millions. They look at one picture, and they look at you, and then they decide if they’re close enough. I feel like we’ve reached the point in image recognition where we can do that with better than a five percent error rate.

        Are they trying to identify the people leaving in a vacuum? Or are they trying to check if the person leaving, whose name is on the flight manifest and printed on the ticket, matches the body walking on to the plane?

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          I threw together a quick POC a few months back that was 90% accurate over ~40 subjects. Took about a day to glue together existing OSS bits.

          I’d agree that the error rate seems astonishingly high.

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            Are they trying to identify the people leaving in a vacuum? Or are they trying to check if the person leaving, whose name is on the flight manifest and printed on the ticket, matches the body walking on to the plane?

            Yeah, let’s all pretend we don’t know what this is geared towards.

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        Oh yeah, the usual US-centric outrage where it’s bad only because it’s about US citizens, who care about other citizens, right?