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    Inspired by your review, I just published my own review on my blog: https://jlelse.blog/posts/surface-go-few-months/

    I really like the Surface Go for writing and taking notes or just beeing productive, but for development, I still prefer either my laptop (an old ThinkPad S1 Yoga) or my desktop PC.

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      Really liked your review. Thanks for posting. It is impressive how much more media and web I use when I am using it. I’ve watched some amazing talks on the sofa with it.

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      A well-considered and enlightened review. You make an excellent point about the constraints being a feature. I bet the Go would make a sweet portable workstation for those who spend their days in ssh, vi or emacs.

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        thanks for the kind words. I think you’re quite right even though I’ve heard that vim doesn’t play as well as it could at the moment with the windows terminal. I’m not a vim user so I’m not sure. It works well enough for my noob emacs skills in editing simple text though.

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        Not very on topic, but how does scoop compare to chocolatey, if I may ask? I’m new to both of them, so not sure what’s the difference; choco seems to be something I see around more, that’s all I know…

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          What attracted me to Scoop in the first place was that it keeps all self-contained in ~/scoop which I think is better. There is a nice page on scoop wiki about it with more information on how they compare.

          I’m not using Chocolatey anymore as most of my needs are covered by scoop already. I also enjoy how I can spin my own scoop bucket and create my own recipes with ease.

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          I had a similar experience - I got my Go as an iPad replacement but before I knew it I had VS Code and OneNote on there and I was spending way more time than I ever expected at its little keyboard.

          Pros - Real computer that fits nicely on a economy-class tray table and goes for ages paired with a suitably capable USB-C powerpack, and with a USB-C/HDMI hub it’s usable as a full desktop
          Cons - Battery life on its own is not great, the CPU is really quite slow, and it’s quite clunky to use it as an ebook reader. Old Edge had epub support and I haven’t found a good replacement yet.

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            If anyone here has questions about the Surface Go, I’ll be happy to answer.

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              As a counterpoint, I’ve also had a Surface Go for the last year.

              My purpose for buying it was the great Linux support along with portability and the touchscreen. I used Windows along with WSL for a few weeks (I mainly use Mac OS and Linux) and couldn’t get past the slowness of the filesystem on git checkouts and my general dissatisfaction with Windows.

              Linux worked like a charm (though with additional steps for WiFi). However for long-term usage I found the screen too small and the keyboard cramped. Additionally one big blocker is you can’t really use this on a couch with the keyboard as there is no hinge.

              I’m now of the view that any mobile device I own needs a decent sized usable keyboard and screen >= 13”. Although I do love the form factor of small devices, I find them unusable and that they lead to passive consumption due to limited input abilities.

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                I totally understand where you’re coming from. I think I mention in the post that it is not a machine for everyone and that your experience may be quite different than mine. Since you’re into Linux and might want a lightweight portable device, have you checked the Pinebook Pro it appears to fit what you enjoy and it is not expensive (its aarch64 thought, it might be a dealbreaker for you.)

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                  Thanks I have been following the Pinebook Pro and might look at getting one.

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                Is it possible to use the type cover (or whatever it’s called) without being connected to the Surface (either the Go or the Pro X)? I find the ergonomics of modern laptops less than optimal. It would be great if I could separate the screen component from the keyboard. That way I could put the screen on a desk, and the keyboard on my lap, so that my shoulders are more relaxed.

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                  No, the type cover is not a bluetooth keyboard (doesn’t have its own battery, etc.) and needs to be connected to the Surface. But you can use any Bluetooth keyboard with the Surface.

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                    I’ve been researching this use case a lot. Here’s my notes:

                    • Third party surface keyboards work generally work via bluetooth, though I’m hesitant of their trackpad quality.
                    • Brydge seems like the highest end version, but I’d wait until after Q2 2020 when they release their new versions. Seems like they’ve invested in making the trackpad large enough to be useful.
                    • The surface neo, thinkpad fold devices coming seem to have a bluetooth detachable keyboard
                    • I wouldn’t recommend it, but the Eve V (a surface pro competitor) used a bluetooth detachable keyboard.
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                      There is an HP 2-in-1 that is similar to the Surface but whose keyboard can work the way you describe. I can’t recall which one it was though.

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                      I’ve had a Surface Go for a while now and have found myself happily using it for Ruby programming and writing. WSL 2 works pretty well. The machine is a touch pokey, but I have found that it forces me to do fewer things at a time as the author describes. Another bonus is being able to use the surface pen for sketching and drawing, which my other machine (a Mac) just can’t do.

                      I tried a bunch of Linux flavors on it as well, but it just seemed like a shame to give up logging in with my face and having excellent high DPI support. Windows 10 isn’t great, but you can get a lot of work done with it.

                      There is something about having a tiny real computer (with a command line, etc) that just seems right.

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                        Got a Go on the cheap a few days ago, intended as a dev machine for input method work {touch, pen, dial}. Added a little homebrew wireless usb-to-ble dongle made from an arduino and some motherly love (some extra security featurer over a normal bluetooth keyboard) to get a decent mini mechanical keyboard. it’s is shaping up as my favorite mobile devstation.

                        Currently running linux (void), problems with the regular suspects (sensors, wifi).

                        Only thing I miss from my normal laptop setup is eye tracking,

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                          I expected it to be more resilient hardware wise. I travel a lot and my hardware gets a serious beating. My iPad Pro (and before that my iPad air) just keeps going with drops and scratches etc. Apple replaced the keyboard cover a few times for free. The Go keeps breaking; both the keyboard and the device itself. And MS is not doing anything because ‘it is my fault’. That’s fine but I read quite a lot of these stories (my friend from London has full insurance on it and he keeps sending it back for random hardware errors and he is far more careful with it than I am). It is not like i’m working in a mine/oil rig or something; I’m a dev and take it on my trips ; the keyboard keeps failing. And compared to any iPad, the battery life is horrible; I mean for such a slow tablet, how is the battery so bad…

                          The surface mouse is really brilliant though; I use that on the iPad Pro as well now.

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                            I’m careful with mine and it is OK. To be honest, Apple hardware quality is hard to beat. If it was not for that silly keyboard they were using up until now I would not be able to flag anything as a hardware issue with them.

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                              The keyboard on the iPad Pro is far worse than the Go one in every (well, it’s less fragile imho) way BUT they know it breaks and they replace it (at least in my Apple Store) for free even though I don’t have AppleCare or any other insurance. The iPad itself is a piece of magic. Endless battery life, fast etc. Just that full OS… I write a lot of code on it via Remotix on a remote mac. Works like a charm really… No lag and with a 4k resolution set, it really feels like you are working on a very large work space with your iPad being the view. You need good eyes though; i’m old but my eyes are still (with glasses) very good, so I can read tiny letters without strain. So for me it’s like having several screens open on a very fast machine remotely. The major issue for me is the esc key. That is too annoying and ctrl-[ is hard to get used to for something I use a LOT of times and you cannot remap it (or I have not found how, but I think you cannot). But you cannot having anything. My Macbook pro is dead in my bag as they don’t have plugs in this place while my iPad Pro has 30% left which means I have hours left and then I have a normal USB battery with me which will add 12+ hours if need be.