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    Anyone else think the aardvark desktop background looks like the top bit of a skull peering out of the screen…

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      Maybe not a skull, but I could see a girl’s head with a bow on one side, and a little whisp of hair on the other side, looking sideways, kind of like a certain Japanese food company mascot.

      To try and keep it on topic, I still don’t know if I’m sold on GNOME, but I’ll definitely at least try it when 18.04 comes out. There’s a big pile of little things across the interfaces that don’t gel with me, but I could see myself switching away from Cinnamon if they (and/or Wayland) got their HiDPI features working better. I don’t see much hope on Cinnamon’s side for the particular issues I am facing as long as it is still on X, but I put up with those because everything else works so well.

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        I’ve been using the latest Gnome 3 at work and Cinnamon at home – just to experiment. Gnome sacrifices function for form and expects users to memorize more keybindings. When you alt-tab it will group windows of the same application – eg. all your terminals are grouped and you have to Alt-` to switch within the group. The window bar default does not show minimize or restore buttons. And the biggest visible difference, the top bar does not show all your windows in Gnome. If you want to know what’s open you either have to alt-tab, or press the super key to bring up the activities menu. The top bar has a lot of unused space – like new Apple products that lack ports and buttons. To contrast Cinnamon shows each window in the top bar – they’re more like thinkpad and a bit less sexy. I’m going to keep using both because I’m an indecisive person.

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          There is a gnome3 shell extension to change the alt-tab behaviour back to *normal” and another one to bring minimise/maximise window buttons back.

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            When you alt-tab it will group windows of the same application

            It’s behavior from MacOS, I’m using MacOS for about 5 years and still can’t get used to it. However it makes sense there, because focus is applied to application, not window on MacOS. Displayed menu depends on app in focus and you can focus on app without windows. AFAIK, gnome has no such behavior (not tried recent versions).

            The top bar has a lot of unused space – like new Apple products that lack ports and buttons.

            I think it was borrowed from early 2000’s mobile phone UIs, almost all old phones (not smartphones) had similar panel too, usually without clock, but with signal strength, battery level, etc indicators. It looks out-of-context on desktop, nowadays industry is too obsessed with bringing handset controls to workstations. IMHO this panel is most frustrating thing in Gnome 3 UI.

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        I tried gnome desktop before switching to lubuntu. Multi-monitor support is definitely one of the biggest shortcomings of gnome. I also think unity is/was the best keyword friendly desktop. Lastly unity is the best looking linux desktop.

        I will switch back to unity if there is an officially supported spin off