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    I’m very happy to be on the board of Ruby Together. If you have any questions, let me know!

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      I’m completely puzzled what 501(c)(6) is. Also, are there any plans to cooperate with other 501(c)(3)s - we’ve got quite some?

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        I’m completely puzzled what 501(c)(6) is.

        Well, first, IANAL. But in general, 501(c) organizations are what’s colloquially called ‘nonprofit.’ The most common of which is a 501(c)(3). As @Irene mentions below, the status of a (6) is both easier to get, and the reason for a (6) more closely aligns with what the mission of the organization actually is: improving a specific trade. The IRS has some documents here: http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-tege/eotopick03.pdf In summary:

        IRC 501©(6) provides for exemption of business leagues, chambers of commerce, real estate boards, boards of trade, and professional football leagues (whether or not administering a pension fund for football players), which are not organized for profit and no part of the net earnings of which inures to the benefit of any private shareholder or individual

        and

        Reg. 1.501©(6)-l defines a business league as an association of persons having a common business interest, whose purpose is to promote the common business interest and not to engage in a regular business of a kind ordinarily carried on for profit. Its activities are directed to the improvement of business conditions of one or more lines of business rather than the performance of particular services for individual persons.

        This aligns with Ruby Together’s overall vision: improving Ruby for the benefit of all businesses that use Ruby. When we talked to our lawyers, they thought a (6) was best, so that’s what we did.

        are there any plans to cooperate with other 501©(3)s

        To whatever means they wish to cooperate, sure. There’s no organization I’m aware of that’s doing exactly what we’re up to, but working together is always good!

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          To whatever means they wish to cooperate, sure. There’s no organization I’m aware of that’s doing exactly what we’re up to, but working together is always good!

          Acquiring money and forwarding it to another organization better fit to do the actual work is a standard cooperation. :)

          Also, advertisement and promotion.

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            The first one, with RubyCentral, has happned https://rubytogether.org/rubygems

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          Wikipedia has an inadequate explanation. It seems as though (6) organizations can do political lobbying, unlike (3)s, but surely that can’t have been the motivation for the difference. Perhaps it was simply an easier status to get, due to the IRS deciding that open source is not a charity because it benefits humanity, which is a broader group than charities are allowed to benefit (cf. https://blogs.gnome.org/jnelson/2014/06/30/the-new-501c3-and-the-future-of-free-software-in-the-united-states/ )?

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            ianal; but doesn’t OSS in this case benefit a specific group: Developers? (considering it’s not about the language itself but ‘everything ephemeral to it’)

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              Sure. But, well, that link has the IRS’s position. It would take legal proceedings to even have a chance to make the case that they’re wrong.

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        Is this something like Python Software Foundation, but for Ruby?

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          I got the impression that it was specifically targeted towards the surrounding infrastructure of Ruby, rather than the language itself.

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            Yes, this is true. Bundler, Rubygems, and development of RubyGems.org are the initial projects we’ve chosen. (Server bills are already paid for by Ruby Central.)

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              Prediction: 2 months from now, blog post from @steveklabnik, “How we used Rust to speed up Rubygems” :)

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                Haha, even I wouldnt put Rust into production before we release 1.0 ;)

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                  Why not? @wycats did it!

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              PSF also supports Python projects besides Python the language and CPython the implementation.

              Looking at 2012 report, in 2012 PSF granted $5,000 for PyPy Software Transactional Memory, $5,000 for Kivy port to Python 3, and $1,000 for NLTK port to Python 3.

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                Right, I guess I just meant that this looked like it didn’t have the scope of something like the PSF

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            How does this organization relate to (or conflict with) Ruby Central? Seems like the mission is the same?

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              Ruby Central basically does two things: pay for RubyGems.org’s hosting, and administer Ruby/Rails Conf. That’s basically it. We are looking to pay for development on core Ruby infrastructure. They’re certainly kind of similar in ways, but also different.

              It’s worth noting that Sarah Mei is a director at Ruby Central, and also on our board.

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                I’d like to add that a different book and a different name it simplifies bookkeeping and outreach a lot.

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                We just announced a small partnership with Ruby Central https://rubytogether.org/rubygems