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    Looks cool! If they aren’t on your list already, hope you’ll cover some of my favorites, including httpie, ripgrep, and jq.

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      I have a draft post that compares ripgrep with ag, ack, and grep itself! Added httpie and jq to my list. I appreciate the suggestions

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        Feel free to reach out if you’d like a biased party to review a draft before publishing. :-)

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      I am writing a new blog in the style of inconsolation, reviewing command-line tools with examples, screenshots, and ideas about how you could put them to use. The first post is up (link below) and I have a backlog of a couple dozen tools that will be reviewed in a similar fashion. I hope the detailed posts about each tool inspire more people to dive into using the command-line and developing new utilities. If you have thoughts about this, I would appreciate feedback on the design, concept, and approach. The first post was just published, covering the exa ls-alternative tool.

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        <shameless-plug> Just in case you might be interested, some people here and on HN seemed to like my up tool :) </shameless-plug>

        Cheers and good luck! :)

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          That does look neat – a comment on your little demo screencast though: it wasn’t immediately obvious to me that the “you should run this program as super-user” warning was coming from lshw and not up itself; at first I thought it was actually the former, which I found rather alarming.

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            Right, I know what you mean. Would you, by any chance, have some idea for some random other flow I could display? Doesn’t have to be ambitious, just easy to reproduce on a typical basic Linux box (so, no nginx logs). Dunno, something from syslog? The thing is, I’m kinda deep enough in the project, that I cannot really switch to lateral big picture thinking about such stuff anymore, for the time being… :/

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              top or ps comes to mind when hunting for a particular process. You can even use the same flow to cut out particular columns .

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            Very nice! A colleague of mine suggested up last month and I loved it, nice to see you on here! Thank you for your work!

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              Thanks for your kind words! :) really happy to hear, this confirms to me it made sense to build it, that I could make your lives this tiny bit easier and more fun through it! :)

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          Looks neat! I hadn’t seen inconsolation before but see the appeal; I used to be excited to see the latest from onethingwell even if it wasn’t useful to me.

          What’s the frequency you’re aiming for?

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            I’m planning on posting a full review about every 1-2 weeks, perhaps more if I find simple tools that are quick to write about. I need to split the time for cli.fan between researching new tools and writing up these posts, so I appreciate the link as there look to be lots of great tools there :)

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              some more suggestions: fd (based on ripgrep), fzf (or a variant), miller

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            (neo)mutt, weechat, ncmpcpp, ranger, (neo)vim: I use these five so much that I have them aliased to m, w, n, r, v respectively. Can’t imagine life without them.

            (w doesn’t really start weechat. It SSHes into my VPS where there’s a weechat instance running inside tmux 24x7.)

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              Very cool! and glad to see it has A RSS feed :)

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                Nice one, thanks!
                I can recommend terminalsare.sexy for shell plugins and customization.

                Void Linux also has a tradition called Advent of Void where every day from the first to the 24th of December a different tool is suggested. 99% of them are CLI. Thanks to it I found out about ncdu, gopass, and other great software.

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                  I appreciate these links, there’s so much good content here! ncdu is definitely on my list, it’s such a good tool.

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                  In terms of hidden gem CLI tools I’m rather fond of z.

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                    How are you picking up the next entries in your blog ? Are you taking suggestions ?

                    If so, may I hint about a tool that I’d like to have a little more exposed (I don’t think there’s been blog entries about it yet)? broot

                    Of course, as the author, I’m available for clarifications and discussions.

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                      Right now I’m picking new entries for the blog by looking through my ~/bin folder and trawling github. However this thread has given me a few new sites to look through for inspiration, and lobsters has shown me many tools from show tags in the past.

                      broot is already in my backlog actually! I have been using it on my personal machine since you posted it here a month or so ago. I appreciated your quick attention to the feature request I raised there too.

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                      Oh! Look into hyperfine, a command-line benchmarking tool written in Rust. It’s extremely easy to use and performs as advertised:

                      $ hyperfine --warmup 3 'ruby' 'node'
                      Benchmark #1: ruby
                        Time (mean ± σ):     203.1 ms ±   4.3 ms    [User: 123.3 ms, System: 59.8 ms]
                        Range (min … max):   196.4 ms … 210.7 ms    14 runs
                      
                      Benchmark #2: node
                        Time (mean ± σ):      98.7 ms ±   4.5 ms    [User: 75.5 ms, System: 20.6 ms]
                        Range (min … max):    92.7 ms … 109.1 ms    27 runs
                      
                      Summary
                        'node' ran
                          2.06 ± 0.10 times faster than 'ruby'
                      
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                        hyperfine is great, it’s actually going to be one of the first posts so I can refer to hyperfine benchmarks in other comparison posts!

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                        Good luck on your new blog! I’m envious about the neat logo with the blinking cursor :)

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                          @delucks, the other day I started looking into a CSS-based blinky cursor myself. FYI, I can’t not steal yours now…

                          But, I think it looks better this way:

                          @keyframes cursor {
                           0% {
                            opacity:1
                              
                           }
                           50% {
                            opacity:1
                           }
                           to {
                            opacity:0
                           }
                          }
                          

                          …maybe that’s just because I want to emulate a very old phosphorus CRT. :)

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                          exa looks like a neat tool. I just added a line in my config.fish:

                          alias ls='echo "use exa not ls"'

                          to force my muscle-memory to use it.

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                            Or you could alias ls=exa? I do this type of thing so I don’t get in the habit of typing an alternate command (like exa) when sshed onto a remote machine where the alternative isn’t installed

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                              I briefly considered that, and then decided I’d rather train myself to type out exa explicitly so that on a remote machine I’m more cognizant of the fact that I’m using ls rather than a less standard tool like exa.