1. 29
  1.  

  2. 12

    What ever happened with the dispute over attribution with regards to this and that third party package manager?

    1. 9

      Like a modern day David vs. Goliath, David lost.

      1. 6

        On the github:

        We would like to thank Keivan Beigi (@kayone) for his work on AppGet which helped us on the initial project direction for Windows Package Manager.

        IIRC Beigi at one point said that was enough for him.

        1. 5

          native package manager for Windows […]

          The Windows Package Manager is distributed with the App Installer from the Microsoft Store.

          I laughed.

          1. 5

            How does this compare with chocolatey?

            1. 4

              Is there anything like this from Apple? Lack of software management tooling was part of what pushed me away from macOS.

              1. 5

                macOS operates a completely different model for apps. Each one is packaged completely in a .app file, so you can have 400 diff. versions if you are so inclined and can park them basically anywhere and they still run. They are even platform agnostic.

                It’s just different, though I guess with flatpack and whatever, maybe Linux is trying to go that direction also?

                You could use nix or pkgsrc or brew if you wanted something more “traditional”.

                Also the App Store exists.

                MS has never had a good story for apps and delivery, and it’s nice that they are finally working on it after a few decades with mostly a terrible story.

                1. 2

                  macOS operates a completely different model for apps. Each one is packaged completely in a .app file, so you can have 400 diff. versions if you are so inclined and can park them basically anywhere and they still run. They are even platform agnostic.

                  That solves the packaging problem, but not the update part. Most macOS apps are either distributed via the app store or come with their own updater. The custom updaters are annoying because the individual apps typically don’t have permission to write to /Applications and so you need privilege elevation during the update process.

                  Homebrew works pretty well for this, but it’s not an Apple-supported thing (I guess now it’s technically a Microsoft product, since it’s maintained by GitHub).

                  1. 2

                    Yeah, pretty much every software engineer I know who uses macOS uses Homebrew. This is like Homebrew, but maintained by Microsoft instead of a third party. Previously there were third-party programs that did this on Windows like Chocolatey and scoop, very similar to Fink/MacPorts/Homebrew for macOS (which were all inspired by *nix package managers).

                    Apple doesn’t seem very focused on command line use cases, so I doubt they’ll ship something like this any time soon. MS has been increasingly focused on these kinds of use cases, probably in part because command line users are often also likely to use AWS/Azure/GCP, and I’ve been pleasantly surprised with all the tools they’ve been releasing lately.

                    1. 1

                      I agree with everything you said, but when Apple sanctioned the .app story as the way to do it, upgrades were not expected every day like they are now. The issue has gotten worse, though Apple’s made it clear the App Store is THE WAY to do this, but obviously not everyone agrees.

                      Homebrew, pkgsrc, nix, etc all handle this fine on macOS though.

                      1. 2

                        I agree with everything you said, but when Apple sanctioned the .app story as the way to do it, upgrades were not expected every day like they are now

                        Apple inherited .app bundles from NeXT. The model was very different there: they were expected to be stored on an NFS or AFS server and updated centrally for everyone. With AFS, you’d generally have a local cache, so it ended up very similar to the app-store model: a central server updates, you grab the latest version and run it.

                        Part of the problem with the macOS model comes from the fact that it tried to merge a user-managed desktop metaphor with a centrally managed workstation system.

                        1. 1

                          I must have missed this reply somehow.. anyways.. :)

                          I 100% agree, I didn’t mean to imply Apple invented their system themselves. Thanks for the trip down memory lane :)

                  2. 2

                    There was at one point an effort to add support for rpm. I don’t think it ever escaped the lab.

                  3. 2

                    Not a big fan of the installer for this. Why the heck do i need to download binaries for 2 (!) versions of ARM (when i’m using x64) and tons of localization files that i will never use ?

                    For now i’m sticking with chocolatey :)

                    1. 1

                      Can I install Microsoft Store packages non-interactively with this from a script finally?

                      1. 1

                        there is an ansible issue that was logged a year ago to ask for a feature in Ansible to leverage the new Package Manager.

                        I would certainly hope script-based installs will be possible