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    Wow. If Microsoft were to start adopting Rust that would be a huge win for both the language and community. It also seems like it might be a good incentive to start looking at some kind of ISO standardization.

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      Not sure which certification they have in mind, but this is along that line

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        I don’t think an ISO standardization and a certification are related in any kind of way here. At all.

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          At all?

          An a language specification by an international body like ISO/IEC or ECMA wouldn’t be beneficial in the same way it’s been for C, C++, JavaScript, C#, and a host of other languages? Microsoft jumping on board to a big open source or open community project tends to make people a little leery — the kind of protection offered by ECMA, for example, seems to have worked out pretty well for C#, the CLI, etc.

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      This is good news in my opinion. Sometimes the best way to prevent a problem is to avoid it altogether.

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        For starters, they might want to have to spend less effort on learning tools and processes to build features without security flaws.

        so the solution to spending to much effort learning tools………is to learn a new language and rewrite my code?

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          To put it bluntly: no. The best solution to solving a problem is preventing it. That is, using a single programming language that precludes most unsafe behavior—rather than, say, learning 15 different tools and which one to use in which circumstances.

          Which of those two would you prefer? Remember: “neither” is not an acceptable answer. Also recall that you are a single person and not an entire corporation. That is, in fact, a relevant factor here.

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          This is the most grudging article I’ve ever read. Everyone knows what they’re talking about, but they take five paragraphs to get to it, as though it’s not at all obvious that Rust is what they’re after. And even then:

          Maybe we can: One of the most promising newer systems programming languages that satisfy those requirements is the Rust programming language originally invented by Mozilla.

          It’s practically the programming language for this purpose—the only one with sufficient adoption, at least—and it’s still owned entirely and maintained mostly by Mozilla! You don’t get Rust without Mozilla; not then, and not now. From the Rust website:

          The Rust and Cargo logos (bitmap and vector) are owned by Mozilla

          The Rust programming language is… sponsored by the Mozilla Foundation (“Mozilla”), which owns and protects the Rust and Cargo trademarks and logos (the “Rust Trademarks”).

          Snark aside, I’m glad to see Rust picked up for something that may be more substantial than browser rendering. Microsoft is undergoing some… interesting paradigm shifts lately, and I always like seeing academics and industry folk working together to make our lives saner (for once). Here’s hoping Microsoft follows through on this “exploration” and really starts contributing to Rust and related projects!

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            You don’t get Rust without Mozilla; not then, and not now. From the Rust website:…

            Would you say JavaScript is owned by Oracle?

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              No, because it would be incorrect to say that JavaScript is “owned entirely and maintained mostly by” Oracle. Don’t cherrypick here, we all know that Rust is a project largely maintained by Mozilla employees, whereas what most people refer to as “JavaScript” is essentially ECMAScript, a language standard that is decidedly not Oracle’s. All they own is the name (not even the (unofficial) logo, like Mozilla!); they were only involved in the earliest stages of development. From Wikipedia:

              Before [Brendan Eich] could get started, Netscape Communications collaborated with Sun Microsystems to include Sun’s more static programming language, Java, in Netscape Navigator so as to compete with Microsoft for user adoption of Web technologies and platforms. Netscape Communications then decided that the scripting language they wanted to create would complement Java and should have a similar syntax…

              The final choice of name caused confusion, giving the impression that the language was a spin-off of the Java programming language, and the choice has been characterized as a marketing ploy by Netscape to give JavaScript the cachet of what was then the hot new Web programming language.

              As an aside, I was not aware that Oracle held a trademark on the name “JavaScript”. According to the patent filing, they jumped onboard early, filing their patent in December 1995. As far as I found, it was only exercised publicly once, against an iOS app developer who incorporated the name for SEO.

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                Don’t cherrypick here, we all know that Rust is a project largely maintained by Mozilla employees,

                This is factually wrong. If you check the affiliations of high-profile contributors, quite a lot are from Facebook, Google, Microsoft, CloudFlare and independent. As an example, the core team itself has only three Mozilla members, one of them being a Servo developer and not being assigned to the Rust project. The core team is specifically named as the team deciding on trademark issues. (see the Media guide you quoted: “unless you have written permission from the Rust core team”)

                Statistically speaking, over 80% of all contributions are by non-Mozillians.

                Practical examples: the async/await feature had a lot of contributions from outside of Rust (e.g. cramerj from Google). The NLL feature was built with a lot of contribution from the outside (spastorino from WyeWorks). A lot of language design happens outside of Mozilla.

                Indeed, most developers working at Mozilla doing Rust are contributing to Rust on the side, in their personal time.

                I also don’t want to be accused of cherry-picking, you raised the trademark issue as your proof and I pointed out that this situation isn’t unusual.

                As far as I found, it was only exercised publicly once, against an iOS app developer who incorporated the name for SEO.

                It’s the reason though why the JS logo is a yellow square with a “JS”, JSConf is called like it is and so on. Enforced or not, no one wants to try that.

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                  If you check the affiliations of high-profile contributors, quite a lot are from Facebook, Google, Microsoft, CloudFlare and independent.

                  Statistically speaking, over 80% of all contributions are by non-Mozillians.

                  Oh hey, color me surprised; must’ve changed significantly since last I checked. I could’ve sworn the main contributors were still Mozillians. I’ll admit, I’d heard people boasting about broader community involvement, but I’ve never seen hard statistics, so thanks for putting those all in one place! Sorry for being overconfident in stating something that is no longer the case. Perhaps there’s a larger communication issue; or perhaps I’ve just been living under a rock ;)

                  Indeed, most developers working at Mozilla doing Rust are contributing to Rust on the side, in their personal time.

                  Now this is entirely new to me—and perhaps to others as well. Rust being a weekend programming language within Mozilla? I wonder why; I would’ve thought people would be trying to apply it to more & more projects beyond just Servo / Firefox. I guess it really is going onward, upward, and outward! I can only hope that Google’s corporate side can be kept at bay, since IMO they have a tendency to overreach. But it seems to me that Rust’s governance is doing a good job of listening to & including the community fairly and evenly.

                  *slowly puts on Rust hat as thunderclouds loom*

                  Hiya! Nice to meet you :P

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                Do you mean Java? if so, then yes, Oracle owns Java. Just like Google owns Go, and Apple owns Swift.

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                    No, JavaScript. Oracle owns the trademark JavaScript just as Mozilla owns Rust and Cargo.

                    http://tsdr.uspto.gov/#caseNumber=75026640&caseType=SERIAL_NO&searchType=statusSearch