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    Wow, this is an incredible gold mine of a paper, props!

    (1) You ever look inside Flash games and find (multiple) drop-in tracking scripts in nearly every Flash game you used to play? (decompiling SWFs – highly recommended activity if you are curious about game tracking!) That’s as easy as it’ll ever get when it comes to figuring out what game companies track you on.

    (2) Okay, I thought I knew so much about pervasive tracking in gaming, but no, apparently:

    There are methods for computing a “financial risk factor” from gameplay behavior, for instance, based on which a user may be denied a loan or a credit line extension [19], or methods to assess “essential qualities” based on gameplay data in order to determine a player’s suitability for certain jobs [20]

    what the heck,

    (3) Another very thought-provoking bit about the limitations of the “informed consent” approach to privacy:

    Furthermore, as indicated by the persistence and prevalence of the nothing-to-hide argument [86], there still seems to be widespread ignorance about the serious risks that can arise from personal data being available to malicious or negligent parties. Thus, it can be questioned whether the doctrine of “informed consent” found at the core of even the most progressive data protection laws, such as EU’s GDPR [92], is appropriate and based on realistic assumptions, or whether more extensive forms of government intervention are needed to protect individuals from consequences of their own unawareness.

    Consequences like invasive targeted advertising, mass surveillance, price discrimination?

    There’s a [93] at the end of the section that references a whole paper about these limitations: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3881776

    (4) I like to think there’s a place for data collection in gaming, and it’s not “how can I extract the maximum value from the customer.” Instead it could be really cool if my data was available to me in a way that teaches me more about my own behavior. I quite like what Quantic Foundry is doing – they aggregate voluntary surveys to study motivations for gaming, and publish their results in their blog.

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      (1) You ever look inside Flash games and find (multiple) drop-in tracking scripts in nearly every Flash game you used to play? (decompiling SWFs – highly recommended activity if you are curious about game tracking!) That’s as easy as it’ll ever get when it comes to figuring out what game companies track you on.

      I still miss Flash games :’( (That said, HTML5 makes the tracking detection a little easier, because now it’s in JS that UBO can handle.)