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    Isn’t evil the actual vim mode for emacs, and spacemacs just a collection of a bunch of packages that happens to include evil?

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      Correct. Also, every time I tried Spacemacs it barfed about installing one plugin or another (it changes every time). Not the friendliest intro to Emacs, LOL.

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        I liked what Spacemacs did but every time wondering whether the next update will just hose your editor was not a great experience. While I was using it, they even added a “revert update” option, so it looks like I’m not the only one who experienced this.

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      Kakoune - Interactive only editor inspired by Vim.

      I find that kakoune is actually very easy to write scripted text processing in, simply because it uses exactly the same language for interactive and scripted use.

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        Some of these seem pretty far fetched. Is screen really “vim” like? surf also don’t seem to have much more in common than hjkl. It would at least be better to say “vi” like, although that too is too much.

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          • lnav
          • weechat has plugin for vim-like shortcuts
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            This is extremely helpful. I do have a question though: why use a vim-like text editor when vim is available? Do any of these text editors offer anything substantial over vim or neovim?

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              Have you ever heard the joke “Emacs is a good platform; it only lacks a decent editor?” Well, that’s basically it. There’s a lot of great software written only for Emacs, and it integrates beautifully with other software for Emacs. So if you want an editor it integrates with, you can install the Vim port for Emacs. Makes sense?

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                I suppose that is a good reason, but most on that list don’t even mention emacs. Perhaps most of them are simply projects that a programmer did in their spare time? I should look into them more; there are surely some gems in this list.

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                  Some people might like the idea/philosophy/concepts of Vim, but not the fact that in many ways it’s still stuck in the past. Projects like Vis and Kakoune are improvements over the fundamental Vim system. Like kqr mentions, Spacemacs is Vim implemented on a much better (pretty much objectively) platform, Emacs.

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              A lot of these projects are dead… or just extremely stable code…

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                Stable code and dead is fine in my book.

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                  Dead implies (to me at least) that it won’t see updates if bugs or security issues are found. That’s not the same as stable.

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                    I’m not as worried about security flaws in most of these products. If bugs are infrequent enough, I’m also not worried about them being dead. Keep in mind for like most of software history, most of the code you had was dead. For certain domains or problems it’s horrible but there’s situations where I could care less. Exception being email and web.

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                      I could care less

                      https://youtu.be/om7O0MFkmpw

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                        Well I could, if I couldn’t care less I would have said that.

                        :)

                        https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/could-couldnt-care-less

                        Idioms don’t always follow logic, or grammar, or even common sense, that’s part of why they’re idioms.