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    I ran it in Qemu. It didn’t work quite right and some things were glitchy, but well worth the download to play around with.

    It really is a fascinating piece of “outsider art”.

    Also thought this article posted here years ago was interesting as well: https://www.jwhitham.org//2015/07/porting-third-party-programs-to-templeos.html

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      I get that mental illness gives old mate a pass on the racist diatribes, but most of those “features” are really bad ideas.

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        As the article put it:

        Don’t write things off just because they have big flaws.

        That said, would you please expand on why most of the features are really bad ideas?

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          I may be the only user of my computer, but I still appreciate memory protection.

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            More to the point: Practically every, if not every, security feature is also an anti-footbullet feature. Memory protection protects my data from other people on the system and allows security contexts to be enforced, and it protects my data from one of my own programs going wrong and trying to erase everything it can address. Disk file protections protect my data from other users and partially-trusted processes, and ensure my own code can’t erase vital system files in the normal course of operation. That isn’t even getting into how memory protection interacts with protecting peripheral hardware.

            Sufficiently advanced stupidity is indistinguishable from malice.

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              But that’s not really the point of TempleOS, is it?

              As Terry once mentioned, TempleOS is a motorbike. If you lean over too far you fall off. Don’t do that. There is no anti-footbullet features because that’s the point.

              Beside that, TOS still has some features lacking in other OS. Severely lacking.

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                Beside that, TOS still has some features lacking in other OS. Severely lacking.

                Like?

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                  The shell being not purely text but actual hypertext with images is lacking in most other os by default and I would love to have that.

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                    If you’ve never played with Oberon or one of its descendant systems, or with Acme (inspired by Oberon) from Rob Pike, you should give it/them a try.

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                      If you start adding images and complex formatting in to the terminal then you lose the ability to pipe programs and run text processing tools on them.

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                        Only because Unix can’t comprehend with the idea of anything other than bags of bytes that unformatted text happens to be congruent with.

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                          I have never seen program composition of guis. The power of text is how simple it is to manipulate and understand with simple tools. If a tool gives you a list of numbers its very easy to process. If the tool gives you those numbers in a picture of a pie chart then it’s next to impossible to do stuff with that.

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                            Program composition of GUIs is certainly possible – the Alto had it. It’s uncommon in UNIX-derived systems and in proprietary end-user-oriented systems.

                            One can make the argument that the kind of pipelining of complex structured objects familiar from notebook interfaces & powershell is as well-suited to GUI composability as message-passing is (although I prefer message-passing for this purpose since explicit nominal typing associated with this kind of OO slows down iterative exploration).

                            A pie chart isn’t an image, after all – a pie chart is a list of numbers with some metadata that indicates how to render those numbers. The only real reason UNIX doesn’t have good support for rich data piping is that it’s hard to add support to standard tools decades later without breaking existing code (one of the reasons why plan9 is not fully UNIX compatible – it exposes structures that can’t be easily handled by existing tools, like union filesystems with multiple files of the same name, and then requires basically out-of-band disambiguation). Attempts to add extra information to text streams in UNIX tools exist, though (often as extra control sequences).

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                              Have a look at PowerShell.

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                                I have never seen program composition of guis. The power of text is how simple it is to manipulate and understand with simple tools. If a tool gives you a list of numbers its very easy to process. If the tool gives you those numbers in a picture of a pie chart then it’s next to impossible to do stuff with that.

                                Then, respectfully, you need to get out more :) Calvin pointed out one excellent example, but there are others.

                                Smalltalk / Squeak springs to mind.

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                                  Certainly the data of the pie chart has to be structured with such metadata that you can pipe it to a tool which extracts the numbers. Maybe even manipulates them and returns a new pie chart.

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                                You don’t loose that ability considering such data would likely still have to be passed around in a pipe. All that changes is that your shell is now capable of understanding hypertext instead of normal text.

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                                  I could easily imagine a command shell based on S-expressions rather than text which enabled one to pipe typed data (to include images) easily from program to program.

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                              But why do I want that? It takes me 30 seconds to change permissions on /dev/mem such that I too can ride a motorbike without a helmet.

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                                That is completely beside the point. A better question is how long would it take you to implement an operating system from scratch, by yourself, for yourself. When you look at it that way, of course he left some things out. Maybe those things just weren’t as interesting to him.

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                                  You could do that, but in TOS that’s the default. Defaults matter a lot.

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                                    /dev/mem more or less world accessible was also the default for a particular smartphone vendor I did a security audit for.

                                    Defaults do matter a lot…

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                                If there are no other users, and it takes only a second or two to reload the OS, what’s the harm?

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                                  Its fine for a toy OS but I dont want to be working on real tasks where a bug in one program could wipe out everything I’m working on or corrupt it silently.

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                                    I don’t think TempleOS has been advertised as anything other than a toy OS. All this discussion of “but identity mapped ring 0!” seems pretty silly in context. It’s not designed to meet POSIX guidelines, it’s designed to turn your x86_64 into a Commodore.

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                              Don’t write things off just because they have big flaws.

                              That’s pretty much the one and only reason where you would want to write things off.

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                                There’s a difference between writing something off based on it having no redeeming qualities and writing something off because it’s a mixed bag. TempleOS is a mixed bag – it is flawed in a generally-interesting way. (This is preferable to yet another UNIX, which is flawed in the same boring ways as every other UNIX.)

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                              This is probably not what you meant to imply, but nobody else said it, so just to be clear: Mental illness and racism aren’t correlated.

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                                Whatever is broken inside somebody to make them think the CIA is conspiring against them, I find it hard to believe that same fault couldn’t easily make somebody think redheads are conspiring against them.

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                                  You’re oversimplifying. There are many schizophrenic people in the U.S., and most of them are not racist. Compulsions, even schizophrenic ones, don’t come from the ether, and they’re not correlated with any particular mental illness. Also, terry’s compulsions went far beyond paranoia.

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                            1. A Constructive Look At TempleOS via jcs 3 years ago | 73 points | 9 comments