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    I can relate to this in more ways than the post lays out. I feel like I’m being talked down to, as if the solution is trivial (it often isn’t). The just-sayers often don’t have a complete picture of the problem and prescribe the obvious solution without taking a minute to understand more about the context.

    It seems to be a certain personality type that tends to just-ify advice, as if to posture themselves as superior.

    Of course, one of them might respond to this whole topic as, “Why don’t you just ignore them?”

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      The just-sayers often don’t have a complete picture of the problem and prescribe the obvious solution without taking a minute to understand more about the context.

      The flip side of this is that sometimes people are very resistant to simpler solutions because they are so wedded to existing context or patterns, even when the cost of changing those patterns is much lower than the cost of a complex bespoke solution.

      None of which contradicts the author’s point about the word “just,” which I’ve been catching myself using too often lately.

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        In only 140 characters, I doubt either the problem or the solution can easily be described, nevermind understood.

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        “Just switch to git!”

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          Better than an unjust switch, I suppose!