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    I really enjoyed this article! I’m kinda surprised they didn’t mention Vipercard

    And FWIW I agree. It’s like as computing evolved we forgot about the fact that programming is a super powerful idea that end users might want to leverage too, and allowed ourselves to be bifurcated into the techno-elite slinging our C-like languages around, and everyone else, who as the article notes will likely only ever come as close as something like Excel allows.

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      For an interesting historical take on this, check out the 1972 book “Man and the Computer,” by John Kemeny, an inventor of BASIC.

      It summarizes computer technology up until that time, and then makes some predictions on what the future may bring. Some of the predictions were amazingly accurate (computers in every house, online encylopedias and libraries, realtime news, social networking, etc.), but the underlying assumption was that average people would interact with computers using programming languages, like BASIC, to script everyday tasks and do simple calculations.

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      Thanks for sharing this! :) There have been many articles about Hypercard’s place in history, but even with that, I enjoyed this perspective.

      It nicely summarises the ethos of Hypercard that I think is sorely lacking from today’s computing landscape.

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        been many articles about Hypercard’s place in history, but even with that, I enjoyed this perspective.

        It nicely summarises the ethos of Hyper

        you’re welcome! glad you liked it

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        The quarterly Hypercard commemoration day? The usual modern alternative is Livecode.

        Would Scratch also qualify?