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    I’m so happy to be font-blind. People who write code seem to like to argue a lot about fonts and I barely have any idea of what a font is. Everything looks great to me. Especially Comic Sans and Times New Roman. I kinda have to look at them carefully to tell them apart.

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      Is this comment satire? Is font blind really a thing?

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        Definitely real. I’ve done 8 years of web dev and still can’t tell if my fonts have loaded or not. I have to check the network pane and element inspector to see if it’s applied.

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      This is your regular reminder that webfonts are terrible and you cannot use them to demonstrate your typeface because people who block them (i.e. everyone reasonable) will see one of their own fallback fonts. Take screenshots instead (without subpixel antialiasing, because—regular reminder—not everyone has horizontal RGB subpixels).

      Granted, I pick fallback fonts I like, so this most likely improves my opinion of “your” typeface, but convincing me that I like fonts I like probably wasn’t the author’s intent.

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        webfonts are terrible

        You state this like it’s an objective fact. It’s not. It’s your evaluation of the utility of webfonts, likely only considering the use cases that you personally care about.

        As someone with a bit of design inclination, I’d say that webfonts are a godsend as long as you use them correctly.

        you cannot use them to demonstrate your typeface because people who block them (i.e. everyone reasonable) will see one of their own fallback fonts.

        Casting yourself as one of a vanishingly small minority of reasonable people and implying that everyone else (almost everyone) is unreasonable isn’t a great way to make your point. And the point itself is debatable.

        For most people, a webfont is the best way to preview the actual font under the actual conditions that it will be used: on their personal monitor, with their personal anti-aliasing settings.

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          because people who block them (i.e. everyone reasonable)

          You are casting everyone who disagrees with you as unreasonable—and that’s a collection of people who, at least currently, are the overwhelming majority of web users (which is why web fonts are used in the first place).

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            Can you give me the elevator pitch of why webfonts are bad? Actually curious for your reasoning, since it’s something I’ve never thought about.

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              Image formats have about a 20 year head start on processing hostile inputs. Font libraries were designed and written with the attitude, if you install a broken font and you don’t like, well, don’t do that and uninstall it. This is a suboptimal security posture.

              Fonts are also much more complex than basic images. They’re essentially programs in their own right. Which, again, complexity, security, hard. Also, if you turn off javascript philosophically because you don’t like other people running code on your computer, fonts are in the same bucket.

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            One of my favorite monospaced font families, from one of my favorite typographers. Making such an expansive, high-quality font free for personal use is quite generous, IMO.

            I like using the proportional one too, in editors that let me set a different font for comments and such.

            And then there’s the customization tool, too.

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              (This should probably be marked as “2014” since it doesn’t look like the page has any significant changes since it last hit the net.)

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                It’s an interesting read, but doesn’t imho make a convincing case for non-payment monospace fonts, and tbh isn’t visually appealing, again in my opinion