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    PPP and Freshmeat. The kids today have no idea!

    Generally not a huge fan of the style here, there are things you still can’t do as easily on “Linux” as you can on an Apple computer, like html design.

    Could be that fewer people cared about home computing those 20 years ago, and Apple wasn’t big shit and smart phones didn’t exist, so more people were intrigued and at least tried a distro or two.

    But try showing a regular Joe of today LibreOffice, and what it does to Word documents, and apologize by talking about how cool FOSS is as an ideology, and how there is no one “Linux”. See what kind of enlightenment that leads to.

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      But try showing a regular Joe of today LibreOffice, and what it does to Word documents, and apologize by talking about how cool FOSS is as an ideology, and how there is no one “Linux”.

      True. In the meanwhile, the vast majority of worldwide smartphone users have a small Linux machine in their pockets. If they have a home router or smart TV it is probably powered by Linux as well. Of course, they don’t even know it is Linux.

      Many traditional Linux distributions and desktops have for a long time skated to where the puck was (trying to replicate Windows and/or macOS) rather than to where the puck was going (appliance-like computers, where the OS is just a technical detail). Plus some occasional cargo-culting (if we turn our desktop environment into a tablet-fest, the users will come).

      I hope that the traditional Linux desktop community has learned from this and realized that their primary market consists of developers and power-users, and will stop butchering the Linux workstation experience for simplicity. The masses of users will never come, that window of opportunity has closed after around 2007 when Vista was a flop and smartphones and tables were not widely used yet. Unfortunately, it seems like some environments still do things like removing menu bars [1] or system tray icons.

      [1] The GNOME HIG literally states Menu bars increase the vertical footprint of an application’s user interface, introduce a large number of disclosure points, and function as a fixed set of inflexible options. For these reasons, header bars and header bar menus are generally recommended over menu bars,

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        PPP?

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          I presume that is Point-to-Point-Protocol, commonly used to provide TCP/IP networking over a dial-up modem link.

          UPDATE: yeah the article confirms that.

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            Ah thought it might have been something like that. Thanks for clearing that up :).