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    Thanks for writing this, I’ve had setting up Pi-hole on my to-do list for a while now in a few networks and I found this incredibly useful.

    I have some friends that have gone the raspberry pi route for this and I share your concerns about something important running on them. However, I’m wondering if there is a counter argument to be made in the fact that you are already advocating for secondary DNS servers being part of the DHCP setup (so the critical function will still be met should the Pi go down).

    My usual concern is ensuring I have sufficient UPS to keep my home network operational for a graceful shutdown (including storage) should we take a power hit, so I’ve debated using using a Raspberry Pi with PoE connected directly to the switch. Then one UPS would keep DNS and switching up at the same time with far less power draw than keeping storage up. In your set up, do you generally keep your NAS running even during a power outage?

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      However, I’m wondering if there is a counter argument to be made in the fact that you are already advocating for secondary DNS servers being part of the DHCP setup (so the critical function will still be met should the Pi go down).

      Yeah, that’s a great point. I’ve just never had much success with stability and Raspberry Pis. So I tend to steer clear of them for server tasks.

      In your set up, do you generally keep your NAS running even during a power outage?

      I don’t have a UPS, so it wouldn’t stay up during a power outage. I’m in the UK, and power outages are very rare. I probably should invest in a UPS actually.

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        I don’t have a UPS, so it wouldn’t stay up during a power outage. I’m in the UK, and power outages are very rare. I probably should invest in a UPS actually.

        That makes perfect sense. I am generally more concerned in larger storms of surges or brief power outages and power flicking off and on quickly and repeatedly due to trees near aerial lines. I could count the total outages in the past 5 years on one hand, but a few times a year get that sort of flicker. Beacuse of that, usually my UPS is just keeping a nice constant source of power, but then in the times of an actual outage I have enough of the network on UPS that I have 15-20 minutes to get in and gracefully turn off the NAS, server, WAPs, etc. That shifts my focus to using as little power as possible for core network functions (i.e. turn off the server quickly), which is why I’m considering a PoE Pi.

        I would completely agree for a small business that it would be far better to run it off their Synology than a Pi, should they have one available. Again, thanks for sharing and bumping this higher on the to-do list.

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          Power surges - definitely! I actually lost my previous Synology thanks to a power surge. I do have a surge protector on the socket.

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      Does this work for ARM synology products as well? I can’t seem to find docker on the ds2018j, the cheapo version.

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        Synology lists the products Docker is officially supported on here: https://www.synology.com/en-global/dsm/packages/Docker

        This seems like a decent guide (albeit from 2017 and some of the steps clearly don’t work anymore) for trying to get it installed manually if you just want to try: https://tylermade.net/2017/09/28/how-to-install-docker-on-an-unsupported-synology-nas/

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          I’m not sure to be honest, sorry.

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            Synology only supports Docker on their Intel models.

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            Great article!

            First, it’s refreshing to see someone writing up making use of open source software in an environment comprised of at least in part proprietary software.

            Second, I have a Synology and love it to bits. One concern I have about doing this as stated in the article is that I own the DS216+ii. It’s a fine NAS but it seems to be accessing the RAID array a lot even when there’s no discernable clients using it, so I wonder how much extra activity adding the Docker app and a container would cause.

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              Thanks for the kinds words. :-)

              Honestly, I’ve not notices any discernable difference between having docker and not having docker running. I’ve just checked resource monitor and I’m seeing very little disk activity.

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              This was a good read. Thank you.

              Although, have you tried AdGuard Home? I have been running it on my Pi 3B+ through docker and it works like a charm! It has default support for DNS-over-TLS, per device configuration, is definitely way lighter on resources than PiHole (thanks to Golang), and also has a single configuration file that makes backups and setup migrations a breeze. For someone wanting to have a network-wide adblock running on a smaller, less powerful hardware, I think it is certainly better than setting up PiHole.

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                I haven’t had a chance to try AdGuard yet, but I have heard lots of good things about it.