1. 12
  1.  

  2. 2

    Wonderful. I was thinking of how to accomplish this last night when I had zero desire to use GitLab to host a small repo I was working on. Thanks for sharing!

    1. 2

      When I was searching for private git hosting software and decided on GitLab, I have to say I was very pleasantly surprised by how easy it was to install Ruby (which I barely use) and Gitlab. Rvm made it a breeze - I didn’t want to install ruby system-wide, and this made it almost as simple as nodejs with nvm.

      But, Gitlab does come filled to the brim with stuff that I don’t really use. So I agree that GitLab is probably overkill. Earlier versions were great, and even though it still is, if it were today I would probably not choose it for the stuff I’m hosting: I leave most of its features unused and it’s become way too advanced for my use case.

      1. 2

        Indeed. For what I was doing (simple JWT server on a Pi for a hobby project) I just felt the overkill was needless. Storing the repo somewhere locally where I could push and pull was all I wanted.

    2. 2

      Nice additions to this setup include

      • Gitolite: provides more convenient management of repositories than sshing into the server and needing lots of permissions. A basic single-user setup is very straightforward (though “single-user” is probably a misnomer, e.g. I have about half a dozen different keypairs for different systems set up to access mine) and you can easily extend it basically as far as you want, out to github-like capabilities.
      • Gitweb: probably wins the prize for Most Bare-Bones Repository Web Viewer, but it’s easy to set up and configure. In Debian, I installed it and a web server from repositories, pointed it to my repository root, and everything Just Worked.
      1. 1

        I’d also add RhodeCode to that list