1. 82
  1.  

  2. 13

    Really cool idea. Would be nice if there was a repository of recipes in this format and people could share recipes. I’ve been using http://based.cooking and it’s really nice to skip the life story of a recipe and all the ads and popups to subscribe.

    1. 3

      Found this on their github org: https://github.com/cooklang/recipes

      1. 1

        Well that’s going in my bookmarks, thanks for the link!

        This looks neat, though I was wondering if I really have a use case for a recipe markdown language. Storing recipes from online so that:

        a) I have a copy that won’t disappear and

        b) I don’t have to scroll to the actual recipe three times while the ads load in

        …might just be it.

      2. 9

        Interesting, a bit like what we came up with for our hardware build instructions. Though we embed ours in markdown.

        https://gitbuilding.io/usage/getting-started/

        1. 2

          This looks really useful too - have you considered submitting this separately so it gets a few more eyes?

          1. 2

            Thanks! I did a little while ago but it dropped off the front page pretty quickly with no votes. May try again at some point.

        2. 6

          How does it compare to http://microformats.org/wiki/h-recipe?

          1. 4

            I think CookLang embeds the information directly in the recipe, while h-recipe prepends it all.

            1. 4

              Also, CookLang writes like (and more importantly reads like) markdown. h-recipe is HTML.

              CookLang looks like it has richer scaling options for recipes where some ingredients don’t scale linearly with the number of servings.

              1. 7

                The downside of the Markdown-like structure is that it doesn’t express any of the dependencies or timing in the structured format. One of the things I really hate about reading recipes is that they use the word ‘meanwhile’ to mean ‘by the way, you should have started this step before the preceding one’. I’d love to see a recipe markup language that captured timings and dependencies so that you could render a timeline of what needs doing when or a graph of what needs doing before what or any other visualisation that you come up with to make them easier to follow.

                1. 3

                  render a timeline of what needs doing when or a graph of what needs doing before what or any other visualisation that you come up with to make them easier to follow.

                  Something like this?

                  http://www.cookingforengineers.com/recipe/60/The-Classic-Tiramisu-original-recipe/trn

                  (The site also has a full recipe at http://www.cookingforengineers.com/recipe/60/The-Classic-Tiramisu-original-recipe, because terseness is often nice, but not the be-all and end-all.)

                  1. 5

                    Close, yes. If I’m cooking multiple things, planning the time so that I can do things while something is settling / cooking / rising / whatever and planning my time so that I don’t have idle and insanely busy periods is the hardest thing. If the recipes contained the waiting time and when dependencies could be left (e.g. I can chop vegetables up front and leave them to the side but if I need to whisk egg whites then I need to use them immediately or they start to deflate so the whisk step needs to have no gap after it) then I’d be able to both machine-generate a schedule and visualise the schedule in a useful way. Without it, it may as well have a prose description.

                  2. 3

                    I’d love to see a recipe markup language that captured timings and dependencies so that you could render a timeline of what needs doing when or a graph of what needs doing before what or any other visualisation that you come up with to make them easier to follow.

                    I agree. And being able to put steps from multiple recipes on a timeline in a way that leads to everything being ready at about the same time would be a nice follow-on to that.

                2. 1

                  The information used by h-recipe is embedded (as markup into HTML).

                3. 4

                  You can probably write a cook-lang compiler to output h-recipes… because we never have enough standards anyway. ;) /s

                  1. 1

                    Also, from the same time… When we still had the ilusiin of a semantic future for the web: https://schema.org/Recipe

                    This is what Google uses to parse a webpage as a recipe.

                  2. 3

                    This needs make-like output labeling so we can model dependencies between steps in a recipe.

                    1. 2

                      This looks very well-done. I’ve been spending some time thinking about some things adjacent to this recently, and I like this better than any of the recipe formats I have either concocted or tried to steal. If my project idea gets beyond the “thinking about it” stage, I’m probably going to use this.

                      1. 1

                        Really wish there was an integration with this an JSON-LD using some vocabulary.

                        1. 1

                          Not quite the same use-case, but I stumbled on a ~yaml take on this just this past weekend: https://github.com/256-recipes/yuml

                          1. 1

                            Now I just need a way to integrate this with inventory management and I can generate a shopping list for the day, week, or month.

                            1. 0

                              I gotta test this out!

                              1. 0

                                This might be the thing to convert me from storing recipes in Evernote and into a git repo….