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    *plonk*

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      I think there’s an interesting power dynamic between a certain kind of Usenet plonk and an IRC k-line.

      The way I remembered , dropping a plonk publicly was a power move. It had a lot more heft if you were a respected member of the group, and could lead others to add the plonk-ee to their killfiles.

      If two members of equal rank got into a spat and one used plonk to try to score a point, it was generally not as effective.

      The thing is, killfiles were private. The user decided themselves whether to add someone to it, and to announce it or not.

      A k-line is both more widespread and can be applied capriciously.

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      plonk

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        Name seems very bait.

        Article doesn’t actually dive into K-Line’s history.

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          What information are you looking for?

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            Specifically, “How the K-line got its name”.

            The title matters.

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              Except I did explain this.

              In short, banning someone from a server was facilitated by adding a K: line to the configuration file; the K stands for “kill”.

              The “kill line” terminology could conceivably originate from Usenet’s “kill file” terminology.

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                Sure, but that’s almost shorter than the title, making the title bait.

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                  What would have been a better title, in your opinion?

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                    Just “History of IRC daemon configuration” -i.e. the same but without the bait- would have been alright.

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                      but the title isn’t bait, it says how the k-line got its name. were you expecting an entire article only about the k-line specifically?

                      the title is also a reference to a class of titles that go “how the x got its y”. I think this comes from a bunch of children’s stories by Kipling but I’m not sure, it likely goes back further than that.

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                        were you expecting an entire article only about the k-line specifically?

                        I was expecting a focus on that which the article lacks.

                        the title is also a reference to a class of titles that go “how the x got its y”. I think this comes from a bunch of children’s stories by Kipling but I’m not sure, it likely goes back further than that.

                        I see.

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            I disagree, I learned a lot.

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              I learned a lot, too. But I didn’t learn how the K-line got its name.