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    A Nod To The 90s Web web kevq.uk
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    It looks great, but I don’t see what it has to do with the web of the 90s. It’s just plain modern, with emoji everywhere.

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      It looks great, but I don’t see what it has to do with the web of the 90s

      From the 90s nodding back, it looks like this. The images don’t work because of some weird SVG magic I assume is to do with lazy loading, and of course it uses CSS.

      Now to be fair this is a Commodore Amiga running OS 3.9, which technically was released in 2000 with a TCP/IP stack and last updated earlier this year. But the hardware at least dates back to 1992.

      I think it looks pretty nice though, at least on a modern machine.

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        What browser are you using, and how does it manage to do modern TLS?

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          I’m using IBrowse which is linked against current AmiSSL, so the TLS negotiation happens on the Amiga. It’s fairly quick on a 68060 at 50mhz.

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            Now that’s more like a website out of the 90s, the IBrowse one. It’s amazing that commercial software for the Amiga is still updated - how many users could that thing have?

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              On the website’s header:

              Did you know… you can drag a browser tab out of the window to open a new window?

              Chuckled at this.

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                Laugh if you will, but IBrowse 2 had this in 1997-98, before almost any other browser.

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                  This one’s even better:

                  Did you know… HTML frames can be resized by dragging the borders (even if they’re invisible)?

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              Thanks to a proxy doing the TLS for me, I managed to load the page on IE8 (released 2009). I had to turn off javascript, or it would give a blank page. The result is not too pretty: https://www.cosarara.me/up/10264.png

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                What do you use for an HTTPS to a HTTP proxy?

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                  And IE4 on windows 95: https://www.cosarara.me/up/4da38.png quite similar. Instead of directly showing a blank page when JS crashes, it asks if you want to stop the script, which is nicer. Too many BSODs though.

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                could you post a direct link to the image? my browser is unable to render the imgur web page.

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                I can’t tell the difference from the previous theme, aside from the overuse of emoji.

                edit: Ah oops. I was on mobile. Looks very funky on the desktop. Nice!

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                At the very least this need an “in construction” image. Preferably animated.

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                  Needs more animated GIFs overall…

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                  Too many emojis for a 90s-style. Their color, style and the way they are used is too 2010’s.

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                    How do I know if this is designed for Netscape or IE?

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                      looks like a modern dev.to theme

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                        a real nod, albeit NSFW, is asiacarrera.com (as in the porn star). That tiling starfield background, the neon animated gifs HRs, the outline ‘glow’ - View source and take a whiff of that hand-written HTML with inconsistent case for tags, …

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                          The 90s web was a cool place to be

                          I disagree. Web accessibility for blind or low-vision users was in some ways much worse in the mid to late 90s than it is today. Windows screen readers didn’t do a good job of supporting websites with layout tables or frames until at least 1998, and then they were only able to work well with IE. Blind people using Linux, or who hadn’t yet made the leap from MS-DOS (there were still some of those in the late 90s), used Lynx, but that wasn’t nearly as efficient or pleasant to use (IMO) as a modern GUI screen reader with one of the major browsers. For instance, there wasn’t a way to skip from one heading to the next, or move around the cells of a table, with a simple keyboard command. And regardless of which browser one used, images without alt text were ubiquitous. And don’t forget about server-side imagemaps.

                          A lot of things weren’t very usable for everyone else either. The other day I was revisiting some music I listened to in the late 90s, and it got me thinking about my memories of the artist’s website and email newsletter. I remember how, when she announced a website overhaul in 1999 (coinciding with a new album), she apologized for the relative difficulty of downloading RealPlayer so we could listen to her track samples and the songs from indie artists that she promoted. Remember how cumbersome streaming audio and video were before we even had Flash as a de-facto standard? Except, of course, for the bgsound tag (which was another obstacle for blind users; a screen reader couldn’t fade down other audio sources at that time).

                          Nostalgia is seductive, but as Billy Joel put it, “the good old days weren’t always good, and tomorrow ain’t as bad as it seems.”

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                            Needs more <marquee> and <blink> tags!

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                              and yet you still HIJACK MY SCROLLBAR

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                                I don’t see any scroll-jacking JS on the page, but there is a scroll-behavior: smooth declaration in CSS.

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                                  I suppose that’s the lesser of 2 evils. At least this prompted me to add scroll-behavior: auto !important; to my user stylesheet.

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                                Similar to this: https://hacdias.com/ by @hacdias

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                                  Absolutely right, Henrique gets a mention on my license page.

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                                  That’s great. I really like when web designs have identities, not just a plain copy of Medium. I have a photographic memory, that’s how I remember websites. Another example of identity is fasterthanli.me’s design, I really like it.

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                                    The need to support mobile devices is a real personality killer. It’s a hard choice, whether to make the pages hard to read for a large portion of the audience, or sacrifice their visual design. I’m not happy when people choose the former and switch from their old design to an “ISO standard 2010’s theme”, but I can’t blame them.

                                    The pointer media query made it somewhat better though. At least you can offer different styles to mobile device users without resorting to JS trickery or maintaining completely different themes for deskop and mobile.

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                                      There’s a lot of personality a site can have while being mobile friendly. CSS-Tricks.com is a good example IMO.

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                                      I might be wrong, but that site strikes me as a modified bootstrap layout.

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                                        Maybe the link I provided is not the best example of “personality”. The blog posts don’t look like the standard “boostrap” design: (For example this is the last article that he wrote: https://fasterthanli.me/articles/whats-in-a-rainbow-table )

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                                      What was painful with the comments? Just on the previous post, you link to a comment that was supposedly helpful but not here any more.

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                                        Managing them - replying to them, filtering spam, moderation etc. I want people to be able to provide feedback though, so by having a guestbook and not a comment form on every page, hopefully it’s a nice balance.

                                        I’ll edit that post to include the comment. Thanks!

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                                        Oh this is a delightful redesign, so much more personality. How did you make these backgrounds?

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                                          It was a mixture of trawling the Internet, and making my own in Inkscape/GIMP.

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                                          I like the increase in personality and being a bit more open about yourself. Truly reminds me of the 90s web.

                                          300kb is a lot in 90s terms though ;) I challenge you to dramatically reduce your website and will accept a challenge from you in return (mine is already quite slim. Less than 5kn iirc).

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                                              Nice job! Looking forward to a write up of how you did it.ä and waiting for a counter challenge;-)

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                                              Haha you’re absolutely right, but it’s not an authentic 90s site (did emojis even exist then?) it’s just a nod to the 90s. Considering we’re in the days of the multi megabyte webpages, I think 300kb is pretty good. 😊

                                              Although, I do like a challenge…

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                                                Sure. For webapps 300kb is alright. but for a blog? ;)

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                                                  I think for any webpage these days, 300KB is ok. It’s way lower than what it was with the old theme.

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                                                    Ah, come on. Accept my challenge and return the favor! I’d be curious what I ought to improve :)

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                                                  Emoji were standardized in unicode in 2010. Windows 7 added support for them in 2012. So no, they didn’t exist in the 90s, not even in the 00s (as we know them today).

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                                                @kev The hover color of your title is the same color as the background, making it disappear. I assume the background on hover should be the accent color, not the background.

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                                                  it’s not hard to make a web page that’s actually exactly like the 90s web, by writing the HTML yourself. easier even than using a JS/CSS heavy theming engine, IMO.

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                                                    Drop shadows - not 90s.

                                                    “Sign up for my newsletter!” - very 90s.

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                                                      In print media, drop shadows were all the rage; in fact, I think the automatic drop shadow functionality was a driver for InDesign adoption since designers no longer had to make them manually in Photoshop.

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                                                      No layout tables?

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                                                        Good one :D

                                                        NB: On mobile it is more like the old version, but still very readable. On the latest release of Netsurf it almost display well !

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                                                            Lucky we’re not actually in the 90s then ey.

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                                                              It works in lynx.

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                                                                You’re right, and I apologize about my rash comment without even trying it first.

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                                                                  Doesn’t everything? It just depends on your definition of “works.” ;)

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                                                                    Well, I do stand corrected by gerikson. The site does indeed work in Lynx, for my definition of “works” being “I can read the text”.

                                                                    Far from everything out there works in Lynx, many sites do not.