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    I don’t care much for the reasons given in the article. To me, it’s the fact that I can run it over SSH, and of course the modal editing (note the fact that Emacs has a VI mode, but not the other way around :^) ).

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      I don’t either. But I only use vim over SSH. For me, the refactoring powers of modern IDEs are worth far more than the editing capabilities of vim. And I don’t have to have a finicky and fragile setup. Not to mention how much time it takes. I used to be a very big vim user with a huge init.vim (ok Neovim user, but whatever) but I found myself significant more productive in a jet brains IDE.

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        It helps that Ideavim (the official vim-keys plugin for Jet Brains’ IDEs) is really quite good (though I’m not a vim power user). I can’t see myself going back to vim for regular coding - I like my IDE features too much, and I actually think people who eschew good IDEs are needlessly hindering their own productivity, or perhaps haven’t really been exposed to the power of (for example) a great debugger.

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          the refactoring powers of modern IDEs are worth far more than the editing capabilities of vim.

          Not every language has an IDE, however. Modal editing is worthwhile learning because it’s portable.

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            Just take good stuff from both worlds. I run Visual Studio with VSVim plugin for example.

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              I think it varies widely by language. I’m a big Vim fan, but If I’m writing C#, no chance you’re pulling me away from Visual Studio. VsVim is not quite as good as real Vim, but you’ll never beat the IntelliSense auto-completion, realtime syntax and type checking, a real Go To Definition, build and unit test support, TFS source control support, etc.

              On the other hand, if I’m writing Ruby or Python, I’d rather use real Vim and do anything I can’t do in it on the command line. Most of that other stuff is either not possible or not needed with the more dynamic languages.

              Haven’t done as much Java personally. I think it’s more usable on the command line than C#, but doing it in IDEA or something instead is such a huge boost for all the same reasons.

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            This article seems to present a pretty good argument for using Sublime, too :p

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              This reads more like “Atom sucks” than anything about vim, frankly :-)

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                I still use vim because it doesn’t spam dropdowns and auto completions at me, bouncing around like a puppy on crack, while still letting me enter text efficiently.

                Performance is nice, but it’s a bonus over the editor just letting me type.

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                  I still use vim because it doesn’t spam dropdowns and auto completions at me, bouncing around like a puppy on crack, while still letting me enter text efficiently.

                  What if the auto completions are useful, and make you more productive than without them?

                  What if the completions would also reduce the need for bouncing around your code like a puppy on crack, looking for the name of a variable or function you’re supposed to use?

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                    What if the auto completions are useful, and make you more productive than without them?

                    If you feel that way, you can use them. Please don’t tell me what I find distracting.

                    Dropdowns and bounciness are available in vim too, if you like things to work that way. YouCompleteMe is an example of it. But I can’t stand using it. Maybe one day I’ll hook it into the quickfix window, where the suggestions and documentation stay nice and static.

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                      Please don’t tell me what I find distracting.

                      I didn’t.

                      I suggested that auto-completions might make you more productive than without them, which would actually probably be the case.

                      Whenever people vehemently defend their choices of sticking with Vim or Emacs despite the fact that JetBrains has been producing IDEs for a long time, I suspect it’s because they have trouble entertaining the notion that their choices might be “wrong”.

                      I mean, you’re not harming anyone else by using Vim, but you’re probably accumulating a vast mound of opportunity costs that could be avoided by adopting an IDE.

                      You might even be aware of it subconsciously, considering the “hostile” way you characterized auto-completions.

                      Granted, you may genuinely be a special snowflake that finds them unbearably distracting, but it’s just not very likely, and sounds like a rationalization for acting against your self-interest by continuing to accumulate those opportunity costs.

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                        Whenever people vehemently defend their choices of sticking with Vim or Emacs despite the fact that JetBrains has been producing IDEs for a long time, I suspect it’s because they have trouble entertaining the notion that their choices might be “wrong”.

                        I spent the last 6 months in a jetbrains ide. It sucked. I’ve tried setting up the ide-like popups and completions in vim. It sucked. The hostility is from experience. But thanks for the smug condescension.

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                          But thanks for the smug condescension.

                          You’re welcome :)

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                          I’m sure this can vary by field (I’m a CS academic, not a full-time programmer), but I’ve personally never found any of this tooling choice to make a meaningful difference to long-term productivity one way or another, as long as you pick something vaguely sorta working. That depends far more on other features, like coming up with good ideas on paper first, keeping motivated, even getting a good night’s sleep. So I choose programming environments mostly by whether I subjectively enjoy working in them. Given that I spend a decent portion of my life working in them, I think it’s reasonable for this to be a primary concern—life is too short to be primarily worried about “productivity”, anyway.

                          At least when I have a choice of course. When I program iOS apps I use XCode, even though I don’t think it’s either a very good text editor or very good IDE, because doing anything else is an uphill fight against Apple.

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                            I’ve personally never found any of this tooling choice to make a meaningful difference to long-term productivity one way or another, as long as you pick something vaguely sorta working

                            Even if the differences in productivity between various tools are small, they compound over time. That’s certainly meaningful.

                            If you save 10 minutes per day, that adds up to around 60 hours per year. That’s a significant chunk of the working hours in a month, for example.

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                      Why not try an auto completion plugin with popup delay option? You won’t get distracted unless you stop the cursor at the midle of a word.

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                      Sympathetic as I am to OP as a (Neo)Vim user, I feel sad that it’s so hard to remix the advantages it finds (resource usage, responsiveness, large-file support) with a non-modal UI.

                      Also, on large-file handling, this comment on vis was useful.

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                        Facepalm at naming an editor the same as a standard 4.4BSD command. :(

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                        Why I still use vim: because it’s pretty damn good, still getting better, and so far, nothing else has enough advantages to outweigh the disadvantage of “not being the thing that I’ve used for the past couple decades”. Although being able to ssh pretty much anywhere and know that it’s there, or at the very least vi is there, that’s a pretty good one too.