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    Another member here (I don’t remember who :() created/is creating GoatCounter which is also an open source, privacy-conscious alternative to Google Analytics.

    I was perusing the Plausible source and saw that they don’t really provide a guide to host it yourself:

    At the moment we don’t provide support for easily self-hosting the code. Currently, the purpose of keeping the code open-source is to be transparent with the community about how we collect and process data.

    For that reason, I think I prefer GoatCounter. Also while being open source is lovely, I don’t think that it really solves the problem of being transparent with user data. Nobody knows what’s really running on your servers.

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      Yeah, that’ll be me :-)

      Self-hosting GoatCounter is still a bit rougher than I’d like it to be, but on the other hand: I’m not sure how many people actually self-host it? I never got any feedback on it anyway; I never did much advertising for the project (yet) other than posting it here.

      I’ll release version 1.0 next week or so; it’s pretty much ready, just wanted to wait past the holidays. Smoothing out some issues with self-hosting is one of the things I’ll work on for the next version.

      Another functional difference is that Plausible seems to store a persistent user ID, whereas GoatCounter doesn’t. You (probably) need a GDPR consent and/or ePrivacy notice for that, whereas you don’t for GoatCounter (probably).

      For that reason, I think I prefer GoatCounter. Also while being open source is lovely, I don’t think that it really solves the problem of being transparent with user data. Nobody knows what’s really running on your servers.

      You should be able to see what data is being sent by looking at the HTTP inspector and/or tracker JS script. This is actually one reason the tracking script for GoatCounter is not minified: so you can easily see what it does (and when gzip compression is applied the size difference is very small).

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      This doesn’t reference Piwik / Matomo, which is a well established open source analytics tool. https://matomo.org/get-involved/

      I haven’t looked at it for a while and it looks like they’ve been in some drama with getting overtaken by for-profit orgs, but it’s definitely still available as FOSS. It looks like Matomo is now the name of the original organisation and open source project, and Piwik, which was the original name has been ditched by the good guys and allowed to be taken over by for-profit orgs, so best to look at Matomo.

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        Matomo has a really difficult UI. I tried it last year and wasn’t very happy with it. It also adds quite a lot of data to your site (~60k of JS, which is larger than almost all my pages on my site), isn’t very easy to self-host, and hosted is rather expensive (cheapest is $19/month).

        I think solutions like this don’t really compete all that much with Matomo, just like spreadsheets don’t really compete with SQL databases.

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          Yea I met the two early devs back when it was Piwik (French devs I think; they were given desk space in the company I worked at). I finally gave Matomo a shot a few weeks ago, but only as a log parser. I remember back then they said you could use log parsing and Javascript, but you needed to load the data as two sites. It’s still that way today. It doesn’t have any means of doing correlation between both tracking types (which would be fun to see what % of clients have Javascript turned off or tracking blocked).

          I can say, Matomo is not very good for log analytics. It’s really meant for the live JS tracking. I too, found the interface pretty cumbersome and didn’t really like it. I eventually went back to awstats. It’s not as detailed, but it has all the stats I care about. I don’t do active tracking and will stick to plain-old-logs.

          I also gave GoAccess a shot too. I only tried the console version, but it seemed kinda neat and gives you live info without needing Javascript embeds or tracking icons. I should give the html output a try as well.

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          Yeah, I know some big privacy based websites that use it. It seems to be a good alternative.