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    For me, I’ve had to learn to divorce the art from the artist. Picasso was a great painter, but he was also an abusive misogynist. Roman Polanski made iconic movies, but also fled the US ahead of rape charges against a 13 year old. Tom Cruise is a great actor, but is involved with a religion known to abuse, brainwash and control adherents. Orson Scott Card wrote critically acclaimed science fiction, but has homophobic and transphobic ideas. I may like the art, but I don’t have to like the artist.

    Of the three computer science projects mentioned, I don’t view Minecraft as being “outsider”—it’s just a game (a popular and addicting one) with a particular aesthetic look to it. TemplsOS and Urbit I will concede to being “outsider” material. In looking at each, I can appreciate TempleOS for what it is, because aesthetics aside, it achieved what Microsoft attempted to do with OLE, Alan Kay tried with Smalltalk, with the extensive hypertext that Ted Nelson was trying to work towards. Urbit, however, I eventually dismissed as a joke project (or an extensive troll) by Curtis Yarvin. The intentional obfuscation of terminology, the smug “look at how clever I am” half-explanations and the “computing but this time done right!” tone turned me off. In the words of Feynman, “I couldn’t do it. I couldn’t reduce it to the freshman level. That means we don’t really understand it.” Curtis never tried to explain it well. My dismissal of Urbit had nothing to do with Curtis’ politics.

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      If Roman Polanski made movies about how awesome it is to sexually assault children, the art and artist would be less easily separable. Yarvin and Urbit are inseparable; Urbit is a reification of its creator’s values.

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        Minecraft started its hype train on 4chan’s /v/ board a decade ago. Based on it being such a self-taught demo of an indie game that got into the mainstream on accident, I’d say Minecraft started as outsider art.

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          Would you consider Dwarf Fortress outsider?

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            Absolutely.

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              Then i think you might have a bit wider definition of CS related “outsiderness” than I do. I grew up in the 70s/80s when any 15 year old could learn assembly (usually on their own) and write a best selling video game in a few months, and I never considered any of them as “outsiders” (more like “I could do that!”).