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    This is great. Time to stop distributing Windows ports of my stuff. I mean, hey, if the Windows folks can get away with saying “just use WINE”, “just use Xlaunch” should be fine, right?

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      People just saying “use WINE” are awful. In some cases it might be the only way, for example when you need to run a proprietary software from a company that went under. This happens in some industrial settings where some driver or client for some machinery just work on windows.

      That being said, living projects who want people on Linux to be their audience should know better than this and ship their apps properly as native Linux binaries if not FOSS, but it is better if it is FOSS that can be packaged by the distros. Specially now with WSL that allows Windows people to build stuff for Linux more easily.

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        I believe we should rather set an example and say “my software is portable, so why yours isn’t?”. I very intentionally make Windows binaries of my stuff available even though I don’t use Windows myself. I also make sure my stuff works on POSIX systems that aren’t Linux unless it has a really good reason not to.

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          I also make sure my stuff works on POSIX systems that aren’t Linux unless it has a really good reason not to.

          This 100x. Making shell scripts without bashisms and supporting static compilation with MUSL instead of requiring dynamic linking against glibc are both so helpful.

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            I also make sure my stuff works on POSIX systems that aren’t Linux unless it has a really good reason not to.

            This is definitely important. I don’t see a reason to support Windows, all other things being equal, given that the people who ultimately profit from us doing so are actively hostile to open source.

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          I use this setup (WSL + XLaunch) daily and am generally very happy with it. Even Eclipse works this way, so you can do serious Linux development when you’re stuck on Windows. You can find the instructions to run Eclipse here:

          https://www.cs.odu.edu/~zeil/FAQs/Public/win10Bash/

          I once contacted the author of this tutorial, Steven J. Zeil, about a missing detail in his explanation and he was very nice and added it to the site.

          I did encounter a few bugs with the X Server GUI, like that copy-paste sometimes doesn’t work if you want to paste over an existing, selected text to replace it. Overall, it’s surprisingly solid though.