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    From the Cloudflare article:

    Workspace that weren’t as inclusive of people with disabilities as they could have been. For example, the open floor plan in our San Francisco office, as well as the positioning of our interview rooms, made it difficult for some to concentrate in the space.

    If “difficult to concentrate on intense mental tasks in a noisy open plan office” means being disabled then there are a hella lot a people with disabilities out there.

    Community space and discussion about a logo and all of these things are nice, as are workplace ergonomics, but all that stuff is easy and essentially free. It’s the sort of thing you don’t really need a “workgroup” for but just an HR department that asks “how ya’ll doing” and “what can we improve for you?” and actually listens to the reply. It’s not that hard. But you know, a workgroup for it can be nice.

    The real test is when it’s hard: when you need to actually make trade-offs, concessions, or invest a non-trivial amount time, effort, and money. You can use all the newspeak “people with disabilities” and “people with blindness” PC woke language you want, almost everyone I know it’s a small thing at best (if they care at all): they just want software that at least vaguely works. And that doesn’t get them fired. You know, details like that.

    Some small start-up struggling with this I can understand. Cloudflare stopped being a small startup quite some time ago.

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      You can use all the newspeak “people with disabilities” and “people with blindness” PC woke language you want

      Some prominent accessibility advocates, at least in the blind community, are against that language. Myself included; I think it’s way too cumbersome, and I’m blind myself (not totally blind, but legally blind).

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      Apologies for being pedantic, but Cloudflare is a publicly traded company so their only mission is paying the shareholders. Everything they say publicly is PR and marketing, including “working toward building a better Internet”.

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        Of course. But I can attempt to publicly shame them with their own PR even though I don’t actually believe it. I’m trying to follow the best tactics I can think of for solving this specific accessibility problem, regardless of my (ambivalent) opinions about Cloudflare in general.

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          I hope it works. Accessibility is always an afterthought unless the corporation is forced to support it, either via law or public shaming.

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          Apologies for being pedantic, but Cloudflare is a publicly traded company so their only mission is paying the shareholders.

          Then public shaming to threaten that bottom line is the only way to ever expect them to behave morally.

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          Cloudflair died for me during a presentation they made for students at my university in 2015. They talked about a revolutionary new secret way to “accelerate TCP connections”. They didn’t out and say it, but based on the performance graph the presenter was so proud of, the only way it could work was them deciding to ignore TCP congestion control ramp-up and bully other connections in congested networks. That was an interesting yelling match in front of a bunch of confused undergrads.

          Cloudflair is not a “good guy”. They exist for the sole purpose of capitalizing on the destruction of a free and decentralized internet. This is only the latest action that abuses minority players in search for more control, centralization and profit.

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            For me, it was the whole “if you report abuse, we send all your personal info directly to the alleged abuser with the report” debacle. (As well as immediately realizing that their core business is just centralizing the internet on themselves. Yeah, arguably AWS is the real giant eating the internet, but CF just feels scarier to me, probably because of how it targets all the little sites by giving unmetered-bandwidth caching for free.)

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              For me, it was the whole “if you report abuse, we send all your personal info directly to the alleged abuser with the report” debacle.

              I don’t see any reason to disbelieve it was a good-faith mistake. This seems like a much harder problem to solve then you’d might think at first sight. I’d say it’s almost impossible to “just get it right”.

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              I can’t really find anything about Cloudflare ignoring TCP congestion, other than some stuff about optimizing it and such, which is fine.

              And like it or not, Cloudflare does solve real issues for people.

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                (edit: All of the following is wrong)

                So, in retrospect I think this was an early implementation of TCP Cubic congestion control(https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/html/rfc8312). Getting higher bandwidth than competition was an explicit claim of the presenter.

                The RFC presents things as if they are universally good, but basically the result in a network dominated by older congestion control methods, is that it eager starts and converges slowly, resulting in it claiming a higher bandwidth share in similar conditions (https://www.hamilton.ie/net/pfldnet2007_cubic_final.pdf)

                Now CUBIC is used everywhere to maintain the arms race.

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                  CUBIC is the default in Linux since 2006 (2.6.19), well before Cloudflare’s 2009 founding. Whatever the problems with CUBIC may or may not be, it seems a bit curious to blame Cloudflare for this.

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                    This is just me digging through docs this morning trying to find things much like you were. They wouldn’t talk to me about the details (unsurprising no matter how you interpret the incident.)

                    Looks like that theory is wrong. I updated my comment.

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              Great call out! Succinct and with clear objectives. Thanks for sharing here as well as HN

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                Matthew Prince posted a reply on HN.