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    A classic.

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      This has actually caused outages at stock exchanges, usually when some hapless fool accidentally mistakes the SCRAM fire suppression button for the unlock door button.

      The noise of the gas nozzles is loud enough and of long enough duration to seriously upset the hard disks in the servers.

      It happened to the Nordic Nasdaq in April 2018 , and also to the Australian ASX in June 2018.

      https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/technology/loud-sound-from-fire-alarm-system-shuts-down-nasdaqs-scandinavian-data-center/

      https://www.afr.com/companies/financial-services/asx-back-online-after-fire-alarm-bungle-20180605-h10ytt

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        I can only imagine the sequence of events that lead to this discovery. Imagine, and sympathize.

        Reminds me of a time a coworker discovered a problem with a motor controller by drumming on the table.

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          There’s a “Making of” video that’s quite interesting.

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          This is a man that is in serious need of some PPE.

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            Now I’m surprised disks in a cluster like that don’t affect each other, spinning as they do at such similar speeds.

            7200 rpm = 120 Hz

            “The voiced speech of a typical adult male will have a fundamental frequency from 85 to 180 Hz, and that of a typical adult female from 165 to 255 Hz. Thus, the fundamental frequency of most speech falls below the bottom of the voice frequency band as defined above. However, enough of the harmonic series will be present for the missing fundamental to create the impression of hearing the fundamental tone.” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voice_frequency#Fundamental_frequency )

            I wonder if the interference comes from portions of the voice spectrum that are a little off of 120 Hz, creating beats, whereas all the disks spinning at 7200 are in sync.