1. 2
  1.  

  2. 2

    In my experience, “full-stack developers” always translates to “programmers who can do frontend code because they have to and it’s ‘easy’.” It’s never the other way around.

    I find this interesting example of how we tend to see the issues from our own context. In my experience as a backend engineer, “full-stack developer” translates to “programmers who can do some backend code if you make them.” Likely we’re both right: he sees the knowledge gaps of full-stack developers from his context as a frontend, while I see the gaps from my context as a backend.

    1. 1

      “Full-stack” generally means “jack of all trades” with the implication that follows.

      I prefer the term “versatile” for somebody who is comfortable going outside their normal area of expertise but doesn’t claim to be equally good at all the things.

      1. 1

        I like to say “software developer” and, when forced, “quick learner”

        Obviously I’m better at things I do every day, but when people say “I’m an X developer” and tie to one language/stack/domain it makes me wonder if they can even handle new situation within their “X”…

        1. 2

          I’m more forgiving of specialization in domains (infrastructure, UI, embedded, etc) than languages or (even worse) specific frameworks. I understand that many people will have strong interest in some domains over others but there’s no justification for a professional software developer to stick to only one language (and definitely not ust one framework) for more than a few years - obviously it takes a few years to become competent in one and it’s actually counterproductive to just keep getting cursory exposure to new languages/frameworks very frequently without taking the time to actually become proficient in any of them.