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    Seems like a bit of a false dichotomy.. Working quickly isn’t at odds with being able to identify the most valuable things to work on. A person that can do both is going to be more valuable than a person with either.

    I agree that the latter is most certainly more valuable than the former, for the author’s reasons listed (operational drag that all work creates).

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      The article was talking about productivity in terms of producing 10 times more output - how do you measure that output to ensure it is adding value. Do those 10x engineers really generate 10x more profit?

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      I think the author is confusing 10x engineer with producing 10x more code. IME, this is not the case. It is more or less what he claims to be doing. Deciding when work doesn’t need to be done and making the work they output have high leverage. Making a library that solves a problem everyone in an organisation has is a “10x engineer” thing. It doen’t have to be a lot of code, but it’s something that will give many hours back to, possibly, hundreds of engineers.

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        the whole 10x engineer meme is confusing and we should drop it entirely. It never defines what 10 is multiplied with. So everyone invents their own interpretation.

        Your comparison is somewhat of an “impact measure”. The problem with that take on “10x” is, that it is dependent on the role/position in the stack. If your job is developing a library, you have easily the leverage to be a 100x engineer. If your job is implementing 10 user stories - good luck with that.

        Some people definitely will see 10x engineer as a LOC metric. Some will use it to propell those memes of “genius” that are hardly helpful.

        My personal take on the 10x engineers: Those that are constructive team players, mentor junior devs and strive to learn from their pears, openly discuss code without becoming emotional.

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          My personal take on the 10x engineers: Those that are constructive team players, mentor junior devs and strive to learn from their pears, openly discuss code without becoming emotional.

          Acting like grown ups, in other words. Maybe it’s time to start drawing attention to the amount of negative production the 1/10x engineers bring to the table.